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Wanderer

[OFF TOPIC] Politics Thread

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14 hours ago, Griff88 said:

Elections incoming in Indonesia (April 17), my "election ticket" was delivered today and it made me think of questions like "do people out there got stuff like this or not".

 

Basically the ticket is one small strip of paper signed by the 'polling station manager' (dunno what is the correct term) with your name and ID number plus the location of polling station.  Even if you have your own ID which is of course also means that you're eligible to vote (aged 17 or more), without this ticket you can't enter the polling station. Those without the tickets can only vote 1 hour before the station closes and only when there are leftover ballot papers left.

 

What is funny about this stuff is since it is done manually, deceased people sometimes still getting these (despite he/she had already passed away like 7-8 years ago) or one family living in the same house sometimes got 1-2 members not getting the tickets.

In India you will be given a similar piece of paper with information of polling station. You can vote by showing the piece of paper and a government ID. If you don't have that paper you can still vote if you have your voter ID and if your name is in the voter list of polling station.  We use 100percent electronic voting machines for national election. 

 

 

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49 minutes ago, Shravan Kumar said:

In India you will be given a similar piece of paper with information of polling station. You can vote by showing the piece of paper and a government ID. If you don't have that paper you can still vote if you have your voter ID and if your name is in the voter list of polling station.  We use 100percent electronic voting machines for national election. 

 

 

Till date I have never received the voting slip from Election Commission ever. Every time, I get voting slip from the parties only. Though I don't use even that and simply go with my Voter ID card. 

 

To vote in India, you need to ensure that your name is their in the voting list which is publicly available. Each voter can only vote in his designated polling station (nearest to his residential address). You just need a proper government ID to vote once your name is there in the voting list. 

 

In India, we use a special ink on nail to indicate who has voted to prevent a person voting multiple times. I am wondering what mechanism is used in other countries to tackle this?

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11 minutes ago, Dolby said:

Till date I have never received the voting slip from Election Commission ever. Every time, I get voting slip from the parties only. Though I don't use even that and simply go with my Voter ID card. 

 

To vote in India, you need to ensure that your name is their in the voting list which is publicly available. Each voter can only vote in his designated polling station (nearest to his residential address). You just need a proper government ID to vote once your name is there in the voting list. 

 

In India, we use a special ink on nail to indicate who has voted to prevent a person voting multiple times. I am wondering what mechanism is used in other countries to tackle this?

Voting pass + ID. When you come in and are handed the ballot, your voting pass number is crossed out and more importantly, they take your voting pass. No pass + ID = no voting, so once you have voted, you can't vote again. No need for ink or 'I voted' stickers or something :p 

Edited by heywoodu

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Just now, heywoodu said:

Voting pass + ID. When you come in and are handed the ballot, your voting pass number is crossed out and more importantly, they take your voting pass. No pass + ID = no voting, so once you have voted, you can't vote again. No need for ink or 'I voted' stickers or something :p 

We need this extra mechanism because there is no central voting list and there are many people who are registered as voters in multiple places. Even I am registered as a voter in both my home town/current residence of Ahmedabad and in Bangalore (where I studied). In recent past, Election Commission has been working on removing such ghost voters (me in Bangalore) but still considering the large numbers involved it is nearly impossible to delete all such unless the voter IDs are mapped to the unique identification number (Aadhar).

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Just now, Dolby said:

We need this extra mechanism because there is no central voting list and there are many people who are registered as voters in multiple places. Even I am registered as a voter in both my home town/current residence of Ahmedabad and in Bangalore (where I studied). In recent past, Election Commission has been working on removing such ghost voters (me in Bangalore) but still considering the large numbers involved it is nearly impossible to delete all such unless the voter IDs are mapped to the unique identification number (Aadhar).

But theoretically one could either remove their nail or 'accidentally' lose their finger and then vote again, no? I mean, if one would be stupid enough to cut off a finger for one extra vote in literally hundreds of millions of votes :p 

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Just now, heywoodu said:

But theoretically one could either remove their nail or 'accidentally' lose their finger and then vote again, no? I mean, if one would be stupid enough to cut off a finger for one extra vote in literally hundreds of millions of votes :p 

Yes. There are ways around this. But this is to prevent casual double voting. Also, at times I feel this is just a relic from the past which could be ditched and thats why I am curious how other countries tackle this. 

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46 minutes ago, Dolby said:

Till date I have never received the voting slip from Election Commission ever. Every time, I get voting slip from the parties only. Though I don't use even that and simply go with my Voter ID card. 

 

To vote in India, you need to ensure that your name is their in the voting list which is publicly available. Each voter can only vote in his designated polling station (nearest to his residential address). You just need a proper government ID to vote once your name is there in the voting list. 

 

In India, we use a special ink on nail to indicate who has voted to prevent a person voting multiple times. I am wondering what mechanism is used in other countries to tackle this?

We also have special ink stuff too.. And usually people vote in order to get special discount in some restaurants lol

 

I think the ink is the cheapest way, especially for 2nd and 4th most populous country.

Edited by Griff88
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Here you receive (around a month before) a kind of "invitational" call list with all the informations when and where to vote. If you are going to be outside of your city/village during the elections day, you have to ask for a permission to vo vote in other place (but you have to precisely announce where) and you´ll receive this special permission before the elections, ofc you´ll be removed from the voting list in your home place.

 

The elections day (usually take place on Saturday from 7:00 to 22:00) you just need to go to your voting station with your ID Card. (and with the special permission if you announced you are going to vote in other place) That´s all, once you enter the voting station you introduce yourself, the guy/girl in the comission will first scratch out your name from the list and only then  another guy/girl in the voting comission can give you the envelope and everything, meanwhile another guy/girl explain you the instructions how to vote.

 

But I guess it´s a bit easier to hold such things in a 5 and half million country :p

 

The thing that I really hate is just our citizens are denied to vote from abroad in certain elections like the presidential, they have to ask for vacation and travel back home to be able to vote...

 

 

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4 hours ago, Dolby said:

Till date I have never received the voting slip from Election Commission ever. Every time, I get voting slip from the parties only. Though I don't use even that and simply go with my Voter ID card. 

 

To vote in India, you need to ensure that your name is their in the voting list which is publicly available. Each voter can only vote in his designated polling station (nearest to his residential address). You just need a proper government ID to vote once your name is there in the voting list. 

 

In India, we use a special ink on nail to indicate who has voted to prevent a person voting multiple times. I am wondering what mechanism is used in other countries to tackle this?

 

in Iran, beside the ID (like every other country) people have something else which is more like a booklet, I can't find an English word for that apparently that's unique for Iran and Afghanistan, some sources use the word "birth certificate" but this is much more than just that.

 

the last page of this is for the elections, whenever you vote they stump (which is unique for each election) on that. you can't vote again in the same election.

 

another "unique" :p thing about Iran is there is no ticket or registration, you just have to show up anywhere you want bring your "thing" and your ID and vote. this is always on a Friday (holiday in Iran) and since everything is political in Iran  even "voting" (I mean just the act of voting, not voting for who) so many people only decide to vote or not during the Friday or  half an hour before the end of it.

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I would like to clarify one thing. One big reason why some here have vote anywhere rules versus definite polling booths in India is because we follow Westminster system vs list based system in many countries. 

 

In Westminster system, we basically elect our MPs. And those MPs elect the PM. Or US equivalent would be if House of Representatives would elect President. 

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