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  1. It is getting so tensed up now. MS 1 - Anthony win MD 1 - Lee / Wang win So it is tied at 1 all now. Well I think Indonesia should have fielded their rank no 1 MD and rank no 2 MD to play today. Surely the Indonesia MD 1 could have won the MD match easily today.
  2. You are right. I also believe that somehow Indonesia will win and prevail today.
  3. This MD 1 match is getting so tense up and tight. Both side also wanted to win.
  4. Yes that is why this group match is getting so tense up as well. Difficult to determine the winner.
  5. It is so tough for Chou Tien Chen. He is no longer a young MS player. He is getting old. On top of that Chou Tien Chen does not have a coach with him when he goes out for any tournaments. All he had with him is just a physio. Tough when there is no one there to guide you and give you tips on how to win matches at the side of the court. I just wonder why Chou Tien Chen wants to choose such a difficult path.
  6. The winner of this match is very tense. Taipei or Indonesia must win the matches for today if they want to progress to play in the quarterfinals. Meanwhile I think Thailand is already safely through to the quarterfinals because they won over Taipei 3-2 already/ Thailand I think can also win over Algeria 5-0.
  7. Such a tough fought MS between Anthony and Chou Tien Chen. What happened at the point of 20-19 during the first set? Chou could have won it 21-19. Then all of a sudden if became 20 all. Umpire said Chou racket hit the net or what? What an unfortunate turn of event and Anthony went on to win the first set. Chou lose focus a bit and subsequently won the first MS match. Anyway it is a very tough fought match. Now the MD 1 match will start.
  8. Really miss the days whereby Susi Susanti is still playing and those days whereby Indonesia women team is so strong that they can even win the Uber Cup. Indonesia 3 Jakarta, Indonesia May 20, 1994 China 2 hide 1 2 3 1 Susi Susanti Ye Zhaoying 11 4 12 10 2 Finarsih / Lili Tampi Chen Ying / Wu Yuhong 15 13 17 16 3 Yuliani Santosa Han Jingna 5 11 5 11 4 Eliza Nathanael / Zelin Resiana Ge Fei / Gu Jun 10 15 8 15 5 Mia Audina Zhang Ning 11 7 10 12 11 4 Indonesia 4 Hong Kong May 25, 1996 China 1 hide 1 2 3 1 Susi Susanti Ye Zhaoying 4 11 11 5 11 5 2 Eliza Nathanael / Zelin Resiana Ge Fei / Gu Jun 15 7 8 15 12 15 3 Mia Audina Wang Chen 11 4 11 6 4 Finarsih / Lili Tampi Qin Yiyuan / Tang Yongshu 15 9 15 10 5 Meluawati Zhang Ning 11 6 11 2
  9. Really miss the good old days. Year Host Final Semi-finalists Winner Score Runner-up 1990 Details Nagoya & Tokyo, Japan China 3–2 South Korea Indonesia Japan 1992 Details Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia China 3–2 South Korea Sweden Indonesia 1994 Details Jakarta, Indonesia Indonesia 3–2 China Sweden South Korea 1996 Details Hong Kong Indonesia 4–1 China South Korea Denmark 1998 Details Hong Kong, China SAR China 4–1 Indonesia Denmark South Korea
  10. While Susi Susanti is still actively playing for Indonesia many years ago, Indonesia really had a very strong women team and they managed to win the Uber Cup in year 1994 and 1996 with Susi Susanti playing in the team. Sincerely hope Indonesia will be able to find another WS player with the strong ability like Susi Susanti.
  11. Really miss the good olden days of Susi Susanti and Alan Budi Kusuma. Well Susi Susanti is the best WS that Indonesia ever had. Gone were the good olden days. Hope to see another WS player from Indonesia with the quality of Susi Susanti.
  12. # Country, Other Total Cases New Cases Total Deaths New Deaths Total Recovered New Recovered Active Cases Serious, Critical Tot Cases/ 1M pop Deaths/ 1M pop Total Tests Tests/ 1M pop Population 1 Denmark 354,393 2,625 345,948 5,820 23 60,924 451 82,866,940 14,245,747 5,816,960 2 Gibraltar 5,476 97 5,296 83 3 162,594 2,880 351,406 10,433,980 33,679 3 Austria 722,357 10,889 688,015 23,453 211 79,653 1,201 82,868,432 9,137,798 9,068,753 4 Faeroe Islands 1,059 2 1,029 28 21,574 41 420,774 8,571,830 49,088 5 Bermuda 4,218 38 2,942 1,238 1 68,034 613 510,104 8,227,749 61,998 6 UAE 732,299 2,073 723,941 6,285 72,973 207 80,279,230 7,999,715 10,035,261 7 Cyprus 116,494 534 90,755 25,205 45 95,642 438 9,366,973 7,690,321 1,218,021 8 Luxembourg 77,189 834 75,209 1,146 9 120,926 1,307 3,497,401 5,479,123 638,314 9 Channel Islands 11,269 97 10,804 368 64,099 552 872,039 4,960,206 175,807 10 Oman 303,309 4,092 293,618 5,599 27 57,623 777 25,000,000 4,749,523 5,263,687 11 UK 7,400,739 135,147 5,958,691 1,306,901 1,020 108,327 1,978 289,860,893 4,242,772 68,318,747 12 St. Barth 1,548 2 462 1,084 156,143 202 38,369 3,870,184 9,914 13 Bahrain 274,179 1,388 272,012 779 2 154,643 783 6,251,034 3,525,726 1,772,978 14 Czechia 1,685,878 30,429 1,650,292 5,157 31 157,073 2,835 37,341,401 3,479,088 10,733,100 15 Hong Kong 12,158 213 11,869 76 1,606 28 24,014,928 3,172,064 7,570,758 16 Singapore 76,792 60 70,124 6,608 18 13,002 10 18,638,817 3,155,830 5,906,154 17 Iceland 11,404 33 11,017 354 6 33,158 96 1,024,988 2,980,223 343,930 18 Malta 36,952 453 35,486 1,013 5 83,419 1,023 1,211,456 2,734,849 442,970 19 British Virgin Islands 2,642 37 2,555 50 7 86,694 1,214 79,575 2,611,157 30,475 20 Maldives 83,494 229 81,544 1,721 23 151,237 415 1,439,012 2,606,556 552,074 21 Anguilla 331 317 14 21,827 38,936 2,567,491 15,165 22 Andorra 15,124 130 14,941 53 4 195,363 1,679 193,595 2,500,743 77,415 23 Turks and Caicos 2,800 21 2,663 116 1 71,153 534 94,789 2,408,747 39,352 24 San Marino 5,388 90 5,240 58 1 158,387 2,646 77,225 2,270,122 34,018 25 Latvia 150,156 2,640 141,576 5,940 35 80,692 1,419 4,129,860 2,219,344 1,860,847 26 Israel 1,220,397 7,511 1,127,750 85,136 717 130,860 805 20,404,489 2,187,914 9,326,000 27 Georgia 593,763 8,498 558,042 27,223 149,192 2,135 8,619,610 2,165,804 3,979,867 28 Falkland Islands 67 63 4 18,601 7,531 2,090,783 3,602 29 France 6,949,519 116,002 6,626,486 207,031 2,000 106,182 1,772 134,787,318 2,059,430 65,448,851 30 Cayman Islands 774 2 720 52 11,612 30 136,206 2,043,356 66,658 31 Wallis and Futuna 445 7 438 0 40,455 636 20,508 1,864,364 11,000 32 USA 42,866,805 691,562 32,483,226 9,692,017 24,850 128,591 2,075 618,987,057 1,856,825 333,357,810 33 Lithuania 315,066 4,777 292,380 17,909 150 117,733 1,785 4,718,392 1,763,160 2,676,100 34 Portugal 1,061,371 17,902 1,009,517 33,952 90 104,460 1,762 17,903,866 1,762,088 10,160,595 35 Greece 629,498 14,433 587,957 27,108 348 60,755 1,393 17,784,581 1,716,460 10,361,199 36 Belgium 1,219,814 25,497 1,133,872 60,445 218 104,698 2,188 19,436,142 1,668,219 11,650,837 37 Aruba 15,221 158 14,790 273 7 141,833 1,472 177,885 1,657,581 107,316 38 Curaçao 16,031 156 15,399 476 4 97,212 946 262,852 1,593,941 164,907 39 Saint Pierre Miquelon 31 31 0 5,382 8,671 1,505,382 5,760 40 Italy 4,632,275 130,284 4,388,951 113,040 519 76,752 2,159 89,156,919 1,477,237 60,353,850 41 Bhutan 2,597 3 2,593 1 3,321 4 1,130,149 1,445,372 781,909 42 Ireland 374,143 5,179 323,325 45,639 66 74,759 1,035 7,110,265 1,420,729 5,004,659 43 Réunion 52,643 358 51,126 1,159 33 58,294 396 1,279,618 1,416,975 903,063 44 Norway 181,765 841 88,952 91,972 19 33,213 154 7,673,875 1,402,220 5,472,663 45 Estonia 149,314 1,325 139,550 8,439 17 112,468 998 1,848,398 1,392,266 1,327,618 46 Monaco 3,290 33 3,218 39 6 83,123 834 54,960 1,388,580 39,580 47 Australia 85,648 +1,592 1,162 +14 63,378 21,108 292 3,312 45 35,607,599 1,377,013 25,858,571 48 Saint Martin 3,646 47 1,399 2,200 7 92,386 1,191 54,303 1,375,979 39,465 49 Spain 4,929,546 85,783 4,633,527 210,236 1,028 105,384 1,834 63,040,355 1,347,685 46,776,767 50 Liechtenstein 3,405 60 3,297 48 1 88,994 1,568 49,126 1,283,971 38,261 51 Russia 7,254,754 197,425 6,485,264 572,065 2,300 49,687 1,352 186,100,000 1,274,566 146,010,443 52 Finland 136,206 1,051 46,000 89,155 20 24,536 189 6,949,536 1,251,905 5,551,170 53 French Guiana 38,266 235 9,995 28,036 34 124,223 763 382,427 1,241,473 308,043 54 Sweden 1,144,982 14,734 1,101,847 28,401 43 112,522 1,448 12,423,746 1,220,926 10,175,672 55 Switzerland 823,074 11,010 736,388 75,676 257 94,266 1,261 10,360,119 1,186,535 8,731,403 56 Greenland 464 362 102 2 8,156 67,368 1,184,180 56,890 57 Mongolia 275,146 +2,777 1,108 +12 262,158 +6,566 11,880 192 82,324 332 3,855,199 1,153,477 3,342,243 58 Montenegro 125,728 1,839 115,890 7,999 11 200,152 2,928 692,117 1,101,811 628,163 59 Canada 1,571,327 27,384 1,498,486 45,457 638 41,195 718 41,973,569 1,100,412 38,143,512 60 Chile 1,646,994 37,339 1,603,507 6,148 445 85,269 1,933 21,193,085 1,097,222 19,315,228 61 Guadeloupe 52,480 668 2,250 49,562 23 131,132 1,669 418,152 1,044,839 400,207 62 Barbados 6,358 57 5,366 935 22,092 198 292,019 1,014,652 287,802 63 Uruguay 387,555 6,048 379,883 1,624 11 111,100 1,734 3,497,016 1,002,487 3,488,342 64 Netherlands 1,983,252 18,111 1,893,588 71,553 194 115,434 1,054 17,043,097 991,979 17,180,897 65 Isle of Man 7,141 38 6,790 313 1 83,443 444 83,753 978,663 85,579 66 Turkey 6,820,861 61,361 6,309,910 449,590 633 79,833 718 82,099,933 960,914 85,439,438 67 Sint Maarten 4,070 59 3,840 171 14 93,636 1,357 41,509 954,976 43,466 68 Jordan 812,681 10,606 789,634 12,441 507 78,703 1,027 9,748,163 944,044 10,325,964 69 Martinique 39,745 555 104 39,086 1 106,012 1,480 348,342 929,130 374,912 70 Kuwait 411,124 2,438 407,824 862 17 94,574 561 4,033,752 927,919 4,347,097 71 Qatar 235,386 604 233,116 1,666 18 83,833 215 2,599,588 925,843 2,807,805 72 Dominica 2,758 8 2,125 625 38,198 111 64,022 886,694 72,203 73 Caribbean Netherlands 1,969 18 1,827 124 74,249 679 23,069 869,905 26,519 74 Belarus 514,446 3,991 501,659 8,796 54,464 423 8,179,442 865,957 9,445,549 75 Malaysia 2,082,876 23,067 1,840,450 219,359 1,165 63,370 702 28,356,181 862,713 32,868,632 76 Panama 464,038 7,170 452,809 4,059 108 105,534 1,631 3,790,505 862,056 4,397,053 77 Germany 4,146,128 93,555 3,882,700 169,873 1,217 49,295 1,112 70,379,237 836,761 84,109,125 78 Saudi Arabia 546,479 8,656 535,450 2,373 361 15,406 244 28,344,483 799,095 35,470,721 79 Cuba 792,933 6,733 747,064 39,136 465 70,058 595 8,948,334 790,613 11,318,220 80 Slovenia 282,935 4,494 265,498 12,943 55 136,073 2,161 1,525,706 733,765 2,079,285 81 Botswana 172,252 2,343 167,318 2,591 1 71,500 973 1,713,133 711,108 2,409,104 82 Lebanon 617,662 8,232 580,346 29,084 200 90,989 1,213 4,780,275 704,192 6,788,312 83 Hungary 817,159 30,123 779,777 7,259 41 84,851 3,128 6,768,975 702,864 9,630,556 84 Brunei 4,957 26 3,335 1,596 21 11,201 59 299,353 676,414 442,559 85 Bulgaria 481,728 19,985 422,355 39,388 396 69,969 2,903 4,597,704 667,797 6,884,879 86 Croatia 391,109 8,493 374,170 8,446 80 95,989 2,084 2,717,509 666,954 4,074,505 87 Saint Kitts and Nevis 1,632 9 909 714 1 30,417 168 34,855 649,613 53,655 88 St. Vincent Grenadines 2,728 14 2,332 382 2 24,495 126 72,099 647,394 111,368 89 New Zealand 4,060 +22 27 3,639 +48 394 5 812 5 3,232,551 646,239 5,002,100 90 Romania 1,144,893 35,456 1,078,434 31,003 798 59,999 1,858 12,223,665 640,595 19,081,746 91 Slovakia 402,066 12,569 383,292 6,205 58 73,600 2,301 3,495,433 639,855 5,462,853 92 Mayotte 20,125 176 2,964 16,985 71,676 627 176,919 630,105 280,777 93 Serbia 860,431 7,733 752,254 100,444 177 98,961 889 5,391,239 620,066 8,694,616 94 Kazakhstan 860,424 +2,781 10,726 +56 787,450 +2,909 62,248 221 45,169 563 11,575,012 607,645 19,048,974 95 Belize 18,532 389 16,518 1,625 10 45,604 957 244,683 602,120 406,369 96 North Macedonia 186,549 6,437 166,851 13,261 89,546 3,090 1,248,079 599,096 2,083,270 97 Grenada 3,841 50 1,347 2,444 33,944 442 66,417 586,951 113,156 98 Armenia 253,093 5,117 235,599 12,377 85,217 1,723 1,646,018 554,221 2,969,967 99 Poland 2,897,395 75,487 2,659,020 162,888 110 76,658 1,997 20,373,472 539,034 37,796,271 100 Argentina 5,238,610 114,367 5,093,351 30,892 1,516 114,634 2,503 24,252,818 530,711 45,698,752 101 Peru 2,166,419 198,976 N/A N/A N/A 1,034 64,614 5,935 17,463,391 520,853 33,528,461 102 Palau 5 2 3 275 9,380 515,413 18,199 103 Gabon 27,643 175 26,149 1,319 22 12,075 76 1,151,098 502,824 2,289,267 104 Colombia 4,939,251 125,860 4,777,796 35,595 542 95,832 2,442 25,011,054 485,270 51,540,486 105 Azerbaijan 470,985 6,280 430,717 33,988 45,950 613 4,731,381 461,597 10,250,016 106 Palestine 382,584 3,909 348,211 30,464 80 72,944 745 2,369,580 451,789 5,244,885 107 Fiji 49,880 566 35,929 13,385 39 55,157 626 397,881 439,976 904,325 108 Vietnam 677,023 16,857 448,368 211,798 6,880 171 42,517,091 432,081 98,400,787 109 Costa Rica 505,163 5,949 406,660 92,554 489 98,080 1,155 2,214,843 430,022 5,150,534 110 Moldova 281,216 6,586 266,724 7,906 94 69,909 1,637 1,691,044 420,388 4,022,575 111 Saint Lucia 10,399 150 7,801 2,448 10 56,319 812 76,141 412,362 184,646 112 Albania 162,173 2,574 146,827 12,772 3 56,428 896 1,148,395 399,583 2,873,981 113 India 33,447,010 444,869 32,664,351 337,790 8,944 23,951 319 550,780,273 394,413 1,396,457,441 114 Guyana 29,345 713 24,978 3,654 32 37,091 901 298,009 376,674 791,158 115 Cabo Verde 36,970 327 35,740 903 23 65,630 580 209,041 371,095 563,309 116 Bosnia and Herzegovina 225,857 10,203 192,218 23,436 69,366 3,134 1,188,929 365,148 3,256,022 117 Iraq 1,972,705 21,775 1,857,873 93,057 609 47,748 527 14,946,506 361,773 41,314,628 118 Bahamas 20,030 504 17,727 1,799 15 50,352 1,267 140,805 353,958 397,801 119 Iran 5,408,860 116,791 4,736,896 555,173 6,836 63,413 1,369 30,123,729 353,167 85,296,026 120 South Africa 2,880,349 86,116 2,728,961 65,272 546 47,834 1,430 17,321,958 287,668 60,215,077 121 Ukraine 2,344,398 54,829 2,230,306 59,263 177 54,000 1,263 12,448,211 286,729 43,414,507 122 Eswatini 45,352 1,194 43,085 1,073 10 38,606 1,016 335,508 285,604 1,174,730 123 Montserrat 32 1 29 2 6,405 200 1,408 281,825 4,996 124 Mauritius 14,243 50 1,854 12,339 11,177 39 358,675 281,462 1,274,330 125 S. Korea 285,931 +1,909 2,404 +10 257,449 +1,420 26,078 333 5,571 47 14,020,498 273,183 51,322,757 126 Brazil 21,230,325 590,547 20,280,294 359,484 8,318 99,026 2,755 57,282,520 267,185 214,392,467 127 Namibia 126,708 3,466 122,040 1,202 19 48,797 1,335 684,387 263,568 2,596,628 128 Kyrgyzstan 177,653 2,586 172,111 2,956 131 26,696 389 1,702,807 255,885 6,654,579 129 Morocco 918,126 13,876 880,091 24,159 773 24,522 371 9,472,031 252,986 37,440,924 130 Paraguay 459,622 16,126 441,547 1,949 36 63,495 2,228 1,814,736 250,698 7,238,742 131 Taiwan 16,129 839 15,144 146 676 35 5,839,805 244,660 23,869,108 132 Trinidad and Tobago 48,400 1,413 42,902 4,085 22 34,449 1,006 334,507 238,085 1,404,989 133 Tunisia 699,224 24,442 668,933 5,849 379 58,422 2,042 2,848,410 237,991 11,968,570 134 Libya 329,824 4,490 244,991 80,343 47,222 643 1,612,927 230,928 6,984,530 135 Sri Lanka 502,758 12,022 431,036 59,700 23,360 559 4,950,195 230,004 21,522,215 136 Seychelles 20,943 114 20,245 584 211,362 1,151 21,504 217,024 99,086 137 Djibouti 11,960 157 11,688 115 11,896 156 213,490 212,341 1,005,410 138 Suriname 36,746 803 26,488 9,455 22 61,966 1,354 120,401 203,035 593,007 139 Rwanda 95,117 1,206 45,429 48,482 23 7,130 90 2,679,362 200,844 13,340,542 140 Bolivia 496,950 +250 18,654 +6 451,049 +649 27,247 220 41,880 1,572 2,357,623 198,687 11,865,993 141 Jamaica 79,127 1,777 50,641 26,709 57 26,581 597 582,429 195,653 2,976,853 142 El Salvador 99,701 3,090 83,342 13,269 158 15,278 473 1,250,900 191,682 6,525,921 143 Japan 1,668,136 17,097 1,564,097 86,942 1,559 13,239 136 23,909,407 189,748 126,006,151 144 Dominican Republic 355,013 4,027 345,996 4,990 141 32,333 367 2,019,733 183,949 10,979,824 145 Philippines 2,347,550 36,583 2,126,879 184,088 3,170 21,083 329 20,226,079 181,646 111,348,750 146 Antigua and Barbuda 2,603 55 1,584 964 9 26,316 556 17,409 176,003 98,913 147 New Caledonia 3,531 +130 22 +6 58 3,451 35 12,225 76 42,756 148,034 288,826 148 Cambodia 103,482 2,096 96,767 4,619 6,087 123 2,341,555 137,744 16,999,370 149 Nepal 783,910 11,028 747,800 25,082 26,331 370 4,085,796 137,239 29,771,431 150 Equatorial Guinea 11,063 137 9,490 1,436 1 7,584 94 195,087 133,745 1,458,650 151 Thailand 1,476,477 +13,576 15,363 +117 1,330,019 +12,492 131,095 4,387 21,089 219 9,201,621 131,428 70,012,592 152 Guatemala 528,588 12,999 475,701 39,888 5 28,858 710 2,403,595 131,223 18,316,860 153 Indonesia 4,188,529 140,323 3,983,140 65,066 15,119 507 36,221,791 130,750 277,030,650 154 Zambia 208,422 3,638 203,998 786 43 10,966 191 2,388,574 125,673 19,006,288 155 Timor-Leste 18,994 103 17,003 1,888 14,082 76 169,501 125,663 1,348,849 156 Venezuela 353,401 4,275 337,230 11,896 681 12,471 151 3,359,014 118,534 28,338,074 157 China 95,689 +66 4,636 90,126 +52 927 9 66 3 160,000,000 111,163 1,439,323,776 158 Honduras 357,654 9,491 108,262 239,901 515 35,427 940 1,012,717 100,314 10,095,444 159 Ecuador 505,860 32,559 443,880 29,421 759 28,154 1,812 1,798,012 100,069 17,967,648 160 Mauritania 35,380 765 33,588 1,027 22 7,375 159 463,147 96,541 4,797,435 161 French Polynesia 40,178 593 33,500 6,085 46 142,033 2,096 26,355 93,167 282,878 162 Zimbabwe 127,739 4,563 120,263 2,913 12 8,446 302 1,344,037 88,861 15,125,095 163 Pakistan 1,223,841 +2,580 27,206 +71 1,132,726 +3,164 63,909 4,964 5,413 120 18,852,460 83,387 226,085,076 164 Mexico 3,564,694 +11,711 271,303 +765 2,916,271 +9,500 377,120 4,798 27,300 2,078 10,347,746 79,247 130,575,284 165 Myanmar 444,871 17,016 395,855 32,000 8,110 310 4,091,516 74,591 54,852,333 166 Vanuatu 4 1 3 0 13 3 23,000 72,824 315,828 167 Lesotho 14,395 403 6,830 7,162 6,656 186 146,630 67,795 2,162,849 168 Sao Tome and Principe 3,040 43 2,582 415 13,566 192 14,689 65,550 224,087 169 Cameroon 85,414 1,368 80,433 3,613 152 3,124 50 1,751,774 64,062 27,345,050 170 Laos 18,814 16 5,568 13,230 2,541 2 447,629 60,462 7,403,489 171 Togo 24,519 213 20,165 4,141 2,880 25 497,435 58,429 8,513,456 172 Bangladesh 1,541,300 27,182 1,498,654 15,464 1,415 9,247 163 9,413,033 56,474 166,679,039 173 Ghana 125,005 1,118 119,601 4,286 42 3,924 35 1,704,233 53,495 31,857,989 174 Benin 21,450 146 17,294 4,010 5 1,715 12 604,310 48,317 12,507,154 175 Guinea-Bissau 6,078 130 5,227 721 4 3,003 64 96,119 47,483 2,024,270 176 Kenya 246,296 4,980 236,803 4,513 114 4,462 90 2,494,312 45,183 55,204,566 177 Senegal 73,622 1,845 69,155 2,622 9 4,261 107 780,049 45,148 17,277,438 178 Gambia 9,867 330 9,504 33 3 3,949 132 101,817 40,747 2,498,733 179 Uzbekistan 167,858 1,184 161,275 5,399 23 4,929 35 1,377,915 40,459 34,056,967 180 Guinea 30,136 370 28,277 1,489 24 2,222 27 546,969 40,327 13,563,448 181 Uganda 122,083 3,123 95,879 23,081 381 2,571 66 1,643,750 34,616 47,485,939 182 Congo 13,701 183 12,421 1,097 2,411 32 188,207 33,121 5,682,365 183 Ivory Coast 58,889 561 56,591 1,737 2,168 21 888,751 32,713 27,168,306 184 Egypt 296,276 16,951 249,793 29,532 90 2,831 162 3,068,679 29,317 104,671,385 185 Ethiopia 332,003 5,115 298,112 28,776 800 2,804 43 3,377,987 28,528 118,407,762 186 Burundi 14,189 38 773 13,378 1,152 3 345,742 28,066 12,318,710 187 Mozambique 149,981 1,903 145,382 2,696 32 4,641 59 888,613 27,499 32,313,897 188 Angola 52,307 1,388 46,025 4,894 8 1,534 41 924,815 27,120 34,101,338 189 Liberia 5,777 283 5,458 36 2 1,111 54 128,246 24,656 5,201,490 190 Malawi 61,337 2,256 51,840 7,241 67 3,109 114 401,287 20,341 19,727,706 191 Papua New Guinea 18,542 204 17,892 446 7 2,026 22 181,868 19,871 9,152,227 192 Sierra Leone 6,392 121 4,374 1,897 782 15 160,729 19,665 8,173,343 193 Mali 15,060 545 14,215 300 719 26 406,897 19,417 20,955,772 194 South Sudan 11,805 121 11,195 489 1,040 11 219,648 19,347 11,352,823 195 Afghanistan 154,539 7,199 122,522 24,818 1,124 3,865 180 756,771 18,924 39,989,145 196 Nigeria 201,630 2,654 190,288 8,688 11 950 13 2,942,578 13,859 212,319,010 197 Somalia 19,004 1,063 9,191 8,750 1,157 65 218,496 13,299 16,429,200 198 CAR 11,309 100 6,859 4,350 2 2,293 20 60,228 12,213 4,931,468 199 Haiti 21,338 597 19,166 1,575 1,844 52 115,741 10,003 11,571,028 200 Burkina Faso 14,025 172 13,681 172 649 8 215,334 9,971 21,596,185 201 Madagascar 42,898 958 41,322 618 3 1,502 34 249,510 8,739 28,551,866 202 Yemen 8,630 1,638 5,363 1,629 23 282 53 265,253 8,662 30,620,866 203 Chad 5,026 174 4,837 15 296 10 143,562 8,447 16,995,520 204 Macao 63 63 0 95 4,811 7,289 660,062 205 Eritrea 6,671 40 6,618 13 1,850 11 23,693 6,571 3,605,903 206 Solomon Islands 20 20 0 28 4,500 6,363 707,258 207 Niger 5,951 201 5,685 65 236 8 151,254 5,987 25,264,194 208 Syria 30,519 2,120 23,007 5,392 1,694 118 103,566 5,749 18,014,890 209 Sudan 38,000 2,875 31,916 3,209 843 64 238,579 5,291 45,087,857 210 Algeria 201,425 5,681 137,775 57,969 24 4,495 127 230,861 5,152 44,809,935 211 DRC 56,387 1,068 30,858 24,461 607 12 306,299 3,299 92,851,165 World 228,944,788 +37,394 4,700,198 +1,057 205,535,451 +36,754 18,709,139 99,737 29,371 603.0 212 Tajikistan 17,084 124 16,960 0 1,744 13 9,796,852 213 Nicaragua 13,025 202 4,225 8,598 1,938 30 6,720,100 214 Comoros 4,104 147 3,942 15 4,601 165 892,020 215 Tanzania 1,367 50 183 1,134 7 22 0.8 61,790,640 216 Diamond Princess 712 13 699 0 217 Vatican City 27 27 0 33,624 803 218 Western Sahara 10 1 8 1 16 2 615,102 219 MS Zaandam 9 2 7 0 220 Marshall Islands 4 4 0 67 59,675 221 Samoa 3 3 0 15 200,014 222 Saint Helena 2 2 0 328 6,099 223 Micronesia 1 1 0 9 116,485
  13. Here is the enlarged photo of tests conducted by 31 selected countries in the world. As can be seen from the chart, United Kingdom did the most number of tests per 1 million citizen.
  14. Number of tests carried out per 1 million citizens in the country.
  15. It goes to say that when more testing is done, more cases will be detected. However if less testing is done, less cases detected. Usually people only look at the number of cases but missed out on the number of test done according to the number of population. Well seems like rich countries may have more resources to conduct more tests. However poor countries may have difficulties to carry out more tests due to financial constraints.
  16. What the professor has mentioned in the month of June that the Tokyo Olympics could help spread Covid 19 has finally come true. What he said is correct and right now the virus is spreading nonstop even though the Olympics has not started and will only start on 23rd July 2021. The professor has warned about the risks of having Tokyo Olympics during pandemic in June. Whatever he said is really happening now.
  17. https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2021/06/japanese-scientists-warn-tokyo-olympics-could-help-spread-covid-19 Japanese scientists warn that Tokyo Olympics could help spread COVID-19 A group of Japanese scientists, including some of the nation’s most senior advisers on the COVID-19 pandemic, is warning that allowing spectators at the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics will help the virus spread domestically and internationally. Their recommendation to bar or at least limit spectators, not yet formally published but described to ScienceInsider in general terms, represents an increasingly outspoken challenge from scientists to the government and the International Olympic Committee (IOC), which remain adamant about going ahead with the games just 6 weeks before the 23 July opening ceremony. Japan and IOC have already barred tourists from entering Japan to watch the games in person. But millions of people in Japan could attend competitions at more than 40 venues in and around Tokyo. That would be a bad idea, says the informal group of 15 to 20 top public health experts, who have met virtually on Sundays since last year to discuss the pandemic. But they worry their warning will fall on deaf ears. Most of the group members likely favor canceling the games, says one member who did not want to be identified. But given the current stance of Japan’s government and IOC, “the discussion has shifted as to whether we should welcome a domestic audience or not,” this scientist says. But it may be too late “to consider any drastic changes in the way that the Tokyo Olympic Games are organized,” says another member, Hiroshi Nishiura, an epidemiologist at Kyoto University. He says the governmental coronavirus control headquarters, which is under the Cabinet Office, has never publicly discussed the risks of holding the games. Shigeru Omi, chair of the government’s top COVID-19 advisory panel, which reports to the coronavirus headquarters, and leader of the informal group, has said he will unveil the recommendations before 20 June. It is unclear whether Omi will present the report as coming from the informal group of experts or get his official panel to endorse it. The precise timing of the release and whether it should go to the government or IOC is still under discussion, Nishiura says. The Olympics, originally scheduled for summer 2020, were postponed 1 year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. But Tokyo and other major cities remain under a COVID-19 state of emergency, and a slow vaccination rollout has led to calls for further postponement or even outright cancellation of the games. Recent public opinion polls indicate 60% to 80% of the country favors cancellation. Yet IOC officials and Japanese politicians, mindful of the billions of dollars at stake, are pressing ahead. When asked at a 21 May virtual news conference whether the games would go forward even if Tokyo were under a COVID-19 state of emergency, John Coates, an IOC vice president, said: “The answer is absolutely yes.” The fraught relationship between the experts and Japan’s politicians and IOC officials was on display last week when Omi appeared before two legislative committees. Holding the Olympic Games “is not normal under current circumstances,” he said at a 2 June appearance before a health committee of the lower legislative chamber, according to local press reports. The next day, he told the upper chamber’s health committee that Olympic organizers should impose “stringent preparations” to minimize the risk of spreading infection. He added that giving opinions was meaningless, “unless they reach the International Olympic Committee.” But Norihisa Tamura, Japan’s minister of health, labor and welfare, brushed off Omi’s remarks, calling them just a “voluntary report of research results” in comments to reporters. Nishiura says one concern is that the games could help spread more contagious COVID-19 variants, particularly given the large numbers of athletes, coaches, officials, media, local volunteers, and domestic spectators. Guidelines from the Japanese Olympic Committee ask athletes and support staff to limit travel to official accommodations and venues; avoid public transportation, tourist attractions, restaurants, and bars; and leave the country within 2 days of the conclusion of their events. Although the guidelines say noncompliance could lead to being barred from competing, Nishiura says there is no indication of how these restrictions will be enforced. As yet, there are no contingency plans for handling clusters of cases that might overstretch health care facilities. Because of a shortage of hospital beds and oxygen supplies during the recent fourth wave of infections, “a substantial number of people died in their own homes,” Nishiura says. In a bit of lucky timing, however, Japan is coming off its fourth wave of infection. Daily new cases have dropped from a peak of more than 7000 on 12 May to just over 2000 on 6 June. Japan’s late and slow-moving vaccination drive adds to these worries. Japan has administered more than 17 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines primarily to medical workers and those 65 and older, covering about 6.8% of the population. Vaccination will start for those younger than 65 in the middle of this month. But the slow pace of vaccination means the Olympics will be going on “when only elderly people are vaccinated,” Nishiura says. The impact of any Olympic-related infections could spread throughout the country and even globally, says Hitoshi Oshitani, a public health specialist at Tohoku University who is an occasional member of the Sunday study group. Over the past year and a half, new cases rose nationwide after most long holiday periods, such as the New Year and the spring Golden Week when most workers can take a full week off. The Olympics will run into the August summer vacation period when many urban residents return to their hometowns to visit parents or grandparents. Last year, a public information campaign successfully convinced many to spend their vacations at home and new cases did not rise significantly, Oshitani says. But with the excitement surrounding the Olympics, he says, “I’m not sure people will listen to recommendations” to limit travel.
  18. https://www.scmp.com/news/asia/east-asia/article/3141551/tokyo-olympics-three-athletes-test-positive-covid-19 Tokyo Olympics: South African cases raise fear of Covid-19 cluster at athletes villages Organisers on Sunday reported 10 new cases connected to the Olympics including media, contractors and other personnel Infection rates are climbing among the general population of the capital, topping 1,000 new cases for four consecutive days Tokyo Olympics organisers on Sunday reported that two South African footballers and a video analyst had tested positive for Covid-19 in the Olympic Village, raising fears of a cluster just days before the opening ceremony. Players Thabiso Monyane and Kamohelo Mahlatsi and analyst Mario Masha are in isolation after testing positive, Team South Africa said, adding that the whole delegation had been following anti-coronavirus rules. “They have been tested on arrival, daily at the Olympic Village and complied with all the mandatory measures,” a statement said. Athletes and delegations from around the world have begun arriving for the Games, amid mounting concerns that Japan’s Covid-19 cases, already experiencing an uptick, will rise even further. Organisers reported 10 new cases in total connected to the Olympics on Sunday including media, contractors and other personnel. That compares with 15 new cases on Saturday, which included the first case of infection at the Olympic Village, a complex of flats and dining areas that will house 6,700 athletes and officials at its peak. An International Olympic Committee member from South Korea tested positive for the coronavirus on landing in Tokyo. Ryu Seung-min, a former Olympic athlete, is vaccinated, reflecting the infection risk even from vaccinated attendees. Tokyo 2020 Olympic Village opens to the media Meanwhile, the Tokyo metropolitan government reported 1,008 daily coronavirus cases on Sunday, topping the 1,000 mark for the fifth straight day and adding to signs that the capital is seeing a fifth wave of the virus. The figure compares with 1,410 infections confirmed the previous day, the highest single-day spike since January 21. The seven-day rolling average of new cases in Tokyo, which is currently under a fourth Covid-19 state of emergency, was up 45.6 per cent from the previous week at 1,068 per day. With the opening ceremony set to take place on Friday, public concern remains high that the games could become a superspreader event amid the spread of the highly contagious Delta variant of the coronavirus, first detected in India. The approval rating for Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga’s cabinet has fallen to 35.9 per cent, the lowest level since he took office last year, a Kyodo News poll showed on Sunday, adding to signs of public discontent with the government’s determination to hold the Tokyo Olympics despite the coronavirus pandemic. The disapproval rating rose to 49.8 per cent, the highest on record for the Suga administration. In the previous survey conducted last month, the support rate stood at 44.0 per cent, while 42.2 per cent disapproved of the cabinet. Covid-19 cases rise despite Games pledge of 85 per cent vaccination rate On Saturday, International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach appealed for Japanese fans to get behind the Games, saying he was “very well aware of the scepticism” surrounding the event. Many worry that increased precautions such as mandatory apps, GPS tracking and “minders” for Olympic visitors will not be nearly enough to stop the introduction of fast-spreading variants to a largely unvaccinated population already struggling with mounting cases. “It’s all based on the honour system, and it’s causing concern that media people and other participants may go out of their hotels to eat in Ginza,” Takeshi Saiki, an opposition lawmaker, said of what he called Japan’s lax border controls. So far, most Olympic athletes and other participants have been exempted from typical quarantine requirements. But they are subject to a restrictive environment at the village, with daily testing, social distancing and no movement possible outside the Olympic “bubble”. They are under orders to leave Japan 48 hours after their event. There have been regular breakdowns in security as the sheer enormity of trying to police so many visitors becomes clearer. Photos and social media posts show foreigners linked to the Games breaking mask rules and drinking in public, smoking in airports – even, if the bios are accurate, posting on dating apps. “There are big holes in the bubbles,” said Ayaka Shiomura, another opposition lawmaker, speaking of the so-called “bubbles” that are supposed to separate the Olympics’ participants from the rest of the country. But as the restrictions are tested by increasing numbers of visitors, officials have been blamed for doing too much, and too little. The government and the Games’ organisers “are treating visitors as if they are potential criminals,” Chizuko Ueno, a professor emeritus of sociology at the University of Tokyo, said on YouTube. There is also lingering resentment over a widespread sentiment that Japan is facing this balancing act because the International Olympic Committee needs to have the Games happen, regardless of the state of the virus, to get the billions of dollars in media revenue critical to its survival. Will Tokyo Olympics with no fans affect how athletes perform? “The Olympics are held as an IOC business. Not only the Japanese people, but others around the world, were turned off by the Olympics after all of us saw the true nature of the Olympics and the IOC through the pandemic,” mountaineer Ken Noguchi told the online edition of the Nikkan Gendai newspaper. One of the highest-profile security problems came last month when a Ugandan team member arriving in Japan tested positive for what turned out to be the more contagious Delta variant. He was quarantined at the airport, but the rest of the nine-person team was allowed to travel more than 500km (300 miles) on a chartered bus to their pre-Olympics camp, where a second Ugandan tested positive, forcing the team and seven city officials and drivers who had close contact with them to self-isolate. On Friday, a Uganda team member went missing, raising more questions about the oversight of Olympic participants. On Saturday, organisers said the first resident of the Olympic Village had tested positive for Covid-19. Officials said it was not an athlete, but was a non-resident of Japan. For the first 14 days in Japan, Olympic visitors outside the athletes’ village are banned from using public transport and from going to bars, tourist spots and most restaurants. They cannot visit anywhere that is not specifically mentioned in activity plans submitted in advance. There are some exceptions authorised by organisers: specifically designated convenience stores, takeaway places and, in rare cases, some restaurants that have private rooms. Athletes, tested daily for the coronavirus, will be isolated in the athletes’ village and are expected to stay there, or in similarly locked-down bubbles at venues or training sites. Those who break the rules could be sent home or receive fines and lose the right to participate in the Games. Everyone associated with the Olympics has to install two apps when entering Japan. One is an immigration and health reporting app, and the other is a contact tracing app that uses Bluetooth. They will also have to consent to allowing organisers to use GPS to monitor their movements and contacts through their smartphones if there’s an infection or violation of rules.
  19. Like it or not Tokyo Olympics have become the place whereby covid cases have been spreading very fast by now although the Olympics have not started. Tokyo Olympics will only start on 23rd July 2021 with the Opening Ceremony. However the unfortunate part is that there are some officials, athletes and coaches who have been detected as positive covid. However IOC refused to reveal the names and the status of the athletes, coaches and officials due to privacy reason. So the question is simple. Should Olympics be held during pandemic time? Is it a wise thing to do? Yes it is alright to have Olympics as it is a grand and prestigious events. However to have Olympics during pandemic time will only encourage the widespread of the virus and endanger the athletes life.
  20. https://www.scmp.com/sport/article/3141546/athletes-village-85pc-covid-19-vaccination-rate-enough-ensure-safe-tokyo Threat of Covid-19 spreading grows at Tokyo Olympics with three infections at athletes village. What happened to 85 per cent vaccination rate pledge? More than a dozen Olympic-related positive tests have been recorded in Tokyo since visitors started arriving for the 2020 Games, including a first case at the Athletes Village It started with a Ugandan coach testing positive for coronavirus on arrival in Tokyo on June 20. Three days later, an athlete in the same team returned a positive result. A Serbian rower tested positive on arrival on July 4 and a Lithuanian was next five days later. On July 14, seven staff members at a hotel in Hamamatsu housing Brazilian athletes were shown to be infected. On Friday, a member of the Nigerian delegation became the first Olympic visitor to be hospitalised, and the next day, organisers revealed that the coronavirus had finally penetrated the Athletes Village – set to accommodate 11,000 people over two weeks – where an unnamed person tested positive and was sent to a hotel for isolation. By Sunday morning, the cases of infection had risen to three. If that wasn’t enough, International Olympic Committee (IOC) member Ryu Seung-min, of South Korea, tested positive after arriving in Tokyo. Saturday’s official tally alone was 15 infections, before Ryu’s case was revealed. The Japanese capital is still under a state of emergency amid a six-month-high surge in new Covid-19 cases but the IOC is standing firm in the face of widespread calls to cancel the Games, promising a safe and secure Olympics with at least 85 per cent of all athletes and officials to be fully vaccinated. Covid-19 cases at the Olympics may, for now, be a trickle, but does the 85 per cent vaccination pledge offer adequate protection to prevent a flood and a potential catastrophe of Olympic proportions? It just about does, said Fabian Lim Chin Leong, associate professor of exercise physiology at the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine in Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. “The ideal is always to strive for 100 per cent of vaccination rate, but this may not be possible for practical reasons,” Lim told the Post. “For example, people with health conditions that may not be suitable for vaccination, people who do not consent to the vaccination, and differences in availability of vaccines among countries taking part in the Olympic Games. “In most public health settings, 70 to 80 per cent of a vaccination rate would be accepted as the level that achieves herd immunity.” Around 11,000 athletes and 7,000 officials are expected to arrive for the Tokyo Games, which open on July 23 and runs until August 8. IOC President Thomas Bach said this month that 85 per cent of athletes and officials living in the Olympic Village would be fully vaccinated, rising from a June prediction of 75 per cent. The IOC also said in March, when vaccines were not widely available, that 270 world championships and world cups held between September 2020 and March this year resulted in no outbreaks, despite involving more than 30,000 athletes. It is not mandatory for participants to be vaccinated but Olympic advisers have said it hardly mattered because vaccination had never been the primary strategy against an outbreak in the first place. Medical and sports analysts have said the 85 per cent rate offered an acceptable coverage considering the herd immunity threshold of 75 to 80 per cent set by most countries. Measures to prevent the spread of the virus – with the Olympics deemed a potential superspreader event by some doctors ­– remain paramount. “Eighty-five per cent is what we’re working with. It is good enough because that’s what we have. It is better than 84 per cent. It will substantially reduce the risk even more,” said Brian McCloskey, a public health adviser to the IOC who chairs an independent expert panel that developed Covid-19 countermeasures for the Games. “I would doubt whether you could calculate a statistically significant difference between the effect of 85 per cent and 90 per cent. It just wouldn’t make a huge difference. When [the IOC] started planning the kind of measures that we would use for the Games, we did not consider vaccination as part of that. So vaccination is a bonus on top of these measures.” All Olympic participants will observe a strict regimen of testing, masking and social distancing as outlined in the IOC’s “playbook” that provides safety guidelines for the Games. They must undergo daily coronavirus screening and will be sent to the Athletes Village’s fever clinic if they have a temperature of 37.5 degrees Celsius or higher or test positive. In Japan, their locations must remain traceable by GPS and they should stay within the village, competition venue or training grounds. No cheering, hugging and high-fives are permitted. Winners will not have medals placed around their necks but must take them off a tray during the presentation ceremony. Organisers have threatened to fine or disqualify rule-breaking athletes, and even expel them from Japan. While officials have come under fire for insisting on staging the Games amid a pandemic, other big events have been held this year such as grand slam tennis tournaments the French Open and Wimbledon. The European Championship football tournament that ended in July had spectators returning to stadiums at reduced capacities. Fans were asked to mask up and keep a distance of at least 1.5 metres, while certain stadiums required proof of a negative coronavirus test. For the final, fans were asked to show proof of full vaccination or a negative coronavirus test with London’s Wembley Stadium allowing 60,000 spectators in to watch England lose on penalties to Italy. Still, social-distancing measures were ignored as maskless supporters gathered after the match. The WHO warned that Euro 2020 crowds could become superspreader events and authorities in England, Scotland and Denmark reported an uptick in coronavirus cases because of those games. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson defended the decision of allowing more than 60,000 spectators to attend the final, as the vaccines had created “a considerable wall of immunity”. Yet for the Olympic Games, organisers had always planned for a “bubble”. Striving for a 100 per cent vaccination rate minimises the risks but is not possible for multiple reasons, said Brett Toresdahl, a sports medicine doctor at New York’s Hospital for Special Surgery. “A vaccination rate of over 80 per cent combined with the other prevention measures have lowered the risk of Covid-19 to a level that is acceptable to the vast majority of athletes and their medical teams,” Toresdahl said. “The estimated vaccination rate of over 80 per cent within the Olympic and Paralympic Village is currently higher than in any other country,” he added. As vaccines become more readily available, the IOC and manufacturers have worked to ensure national delegations have ready access to jabs. The Chinese Olympic Committee in March offered to provide China-made vaccines for athletes going to Tokyo 2020 and the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics. Russia has also offered the Sputnik V vaccine to some African nations. In May, the IOC struck a deal with German vaccine developer BioNTech and US pharmaceutical company Pfizer to provide their Covid-19 vaccine. Inoculation hubs were set up in the capitals of Rwanda and Qatar for delegations whose countries couldn’t provide injections locally. Two out of five Afghan athletes were inoculated with the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, under the IOC’s agreement with the companies, in the Qatar vaccination hub, its National Olympic Committee told the Post. Tracking down the vaccination rates of each nation’s delegations is also an uphill task. The IOC declined to reveal the number of vaccines provided to each country. Most Olympic committees did not respond to the Post’s requests for comment. The few that did decline to reveal the number of athletes who have already received jabs. In Hong Kong, close to 100 per cent of its 46 athletes competing in the Olympics will be vaccinated. Yet, the exact figure remains undisclosed, deemed by the Hong Kong Sports Institute as “very personal and related to athletes’ privacy”. The US Olympic and Paralympic Committee is also not tracking or mandating its 800-plus athletes to be vaccinated but replies from responsive Olympic committees offer a glimpse into the difficulties of getting athletes and staff inoculated. Slovakia has around 90 per cent of its 41 athletes vaccinated, its Olympic committee said. “Just a few members were not interested in getting vaccinated. Some were infected by Sars-CoV-2 in February or March, so they were still within the 180 days period of natural immunisation,” its spokesman said, using the coronavirus’ scientific name. As for Malawi, one out of its five taking part athletes is underage. The 15-year-old will attend the Games unvaccinated. The delegation was inoculated with the AstraZeneca jab under its country’s vaccine roll-out, and the WHO has not recommended it for those aged under 18. Despite the risks, the IOC is absolving itself of any responsibility should an athlete contract the virus. All athletes must sign a waiver – said to be typical for major sports events – but with wording that releases organisers from any Covid-19 liability. Certain sports could also be at a greater risk of Covid-19 infection, especially close-contact indoor sports such as fencing, boxing and wrestling, according to Lisa Brosseau, a respiratory-protection research consultant for the University of Minnesota’s Centre for Infectious Disease Research and Policy. Any sport that takes place outdoors with no close contact, such as archery, golf and surfing, are at low risk. Current safety measures also do not recognise the exposure to human-generated aerosols, or small particles, in indoor spaces, said Brosseau. In shared spaces and in proximity to others, Brosseau warned the current safety measures are not effective. “Masks are not effective at limiting the emission or inhalation of small infectious particles generated during breathing or talking,” said Brosseau. “I believe transport will occur in small buses. I am concerned about the bus driver who will have the highest exposure – meeting many people in a day.” Furthermore, not all staff, volunteers and members of the media would be fully vaccinated during the Games, said Toresdahl. The IOC said 70 to 80 per cent of the media representatives would be vaccinated while all 70,000 volunteers were expected to be inoculated. “While the available vaccines are very effective, Covid-19 infections can still occur,” said Toresdahl. Lim from Singapore said extra precautions athletes must take at the Games may also lower their protection levels. “Another risk is the impact that travelling, time zone differences and competition stress have on the immune system. That may lower the resistance to counter the effects of the Covid-19 virus,” said Lim, though he said there was insufficient data to fully understand its risks. McCloskey, the independent health adviser to the IOC, however, said there was little evidence to suggest the coronavirus could be spread at a sporting event. “We had positive cases at the tennis and football tournaments, but those happened from people being infected at home, not during the field of play,” he said. Even before vaccines were widely available, many indoor contact sporting events were held with minimal Covid-19 transmission when testing and prevention measures were implemented, said Toresdahl. “As the pandemic continues and sporting events resume, event organisers and medical staff are learning more about how to minimise the risk of Covid-19 to an acceptable level,” said Toresdahl.
  21. Well totally agreed by the suggestions given that there is not much point to discuss about the cancellation of the Tokyo Olympics now. Anyway there is still no confirmation from IOC yet. Just need to wait till July and then the truth will be revealed by then.
  22. Demonstrators protest against the Olympics in Tokyo on May 17.
  23. https://edition.cnn.com/2021/05/19/sport/tokyo-olympics-possible-cancellation-spt-intl/index.html (CNN)With a little over two months until the start of the Tokyo Olympics, the possibility of a cancellation looms large over the Games. As Japan battles a fourth wave of coronavirus infections and a state of emergency in Tokyo and other prefectures remains in place until the end of the month, there is mounting pressure from health experts, business leaders and the Japanese public to call off the Games. Last week, the Tokyo Medical Practitioners Association, an organization of about 6,000 doctors in Tokyo, penned a letter calling for a cancellation, while a petition which garnered 350,000 signatures in nine days in support of a cancellation has been submitted to organizers. Also last week, the CEO of leading Japanese e-commerce company Rakuten said that holding the Games amid the pandemic amounts to a "suicide mission" -- among the strongest opposition so far voiced by a business leader. However, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has remained adamant that the Olympics, already postponed by a year amid the pandemic, will be able to get underway on July 23. Organizers have released a playbook, the final version of which is expected next month, outlining a series of countermeasures that they say will ensure the Games can take place in a safe and secure way, even as thousands of athletes from around the world descend on Tokyo. With the Winter Olympics in Beijing now less than a year away, officials have also said that the Games won't be postponed again and that a cancellation would be the likeliest option if it's deemed unsafe to hold the Games from the rescheduled start date in July. How would a cancellation come about? In the host city contract which outlines the legal agreement between the IOC and Tokyo to hosting the Games, the IOC is entitled to terminate the contract on the grounds that "the safety of participants in the Games would be seriously threatened or jeopardized for any reason whatsoever." According to legal expert Jack Anderson, it's likely to be growing pressure on the organizers that forces a cancellation -- a "political decision," rather than a strictly legal one. "It's the safety of those athletes, which are a primary concern of the IOC, the safety of the Japanese public, the primary concern of the organizing committee and the Japanese political establishment, which is the key," Anderson, a professor of Law teaching at Melbourne Law School in Australia, tells CNN Sport. "And this is not an ordinary one-off event. It is obviously a huge multidisciplinary event across many different stadia." Anderson adds that a termination of the host city contract would see the risks and losses fall largely with the organizing committee, which is mandated to take out insurance for the Games. "In that way, it's straightforward," he says. "But of course, in other ways it's not straightforward because it's not simply a contract between the International Olympic Committee and the host organizing. "We have sponsorship contracts, we have broadcasting, we have hospitality, we have a range -- a contractual web of liabilities -- that are in place here. It's a huge contractual issue and would have huge insurance ramifications if it were to not go ahead." According to a Reuters report from January, insurers are facing a $2-3 billion loss if the Olympics are canceled, amounting to the largest ever claim in the global event cancellation market. And for organizers, the financial impact of canceling the Games, even with insurance payouts, could be considerable given that close to 75% of the IOC's total funding comes from broadcasting rights. "The International Olympic Committee -- while it is now a very rich organization -- its wealth is predicated on its primary asset, which is hosting the Games," Anderson explains. "Therefore, not to have a Games, and the knock-on effect that that has for sponsorship, for broadcasting, would be huge. It would be difficult to measure that. But I think you could comfortably say that insurance alone would not cover it in terms of reputation and economic damage." What about the athletes? Arguably, it would be the athletes who miss out most from a canceled Olympics. Speaking to CNN Sport last week, World Athletics president Seb Coe said that 70% of those chasing Olympic participation are only going to have one chance to compete at what is likely to be the pinnacle of their sporting careers. To cancel the Games, Coe said, would be to "discard a generation of athletes who have spent over half their young lives in pursuit of this one moment." The other issue when it comes to athletes is that countries around the world are at different stages of pandemic recovery and have varying access to vaccines, although Coe said he thinks "the bulk of the world will be at the Games." With public pressure to cancel the Games mounting, Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga said last week that he has "never put (the) Olympics" as a priority. "My priority has been to protect the lives and health of the Japanese population. We must first prevent the spread of the virus," he said. The Olympics have been canceled on three previous occasions: in 1916, 1940 and 1944, each time because of world wars.
  24. https://www.reuters.com/lifestyle/sports/tokyo-doctors-call-cancellation-olympic-games-due-covid-19-2021-05-18/ Tokyo doctors call for cancellation of Olympic Games due to COVID-19 A top medical organisation has thrown its weight behind calls to cancel the Tokyo Olympics saying hospitals are already overwhelmed as the country battles a spike in coronavirus infections less than three months from the start of the Games. The Tokyo Medical Practitioners Association representing about 6,000 primary care doctors said hospitals in the Games host city "have their hands full and have almost no spare capacity" amid a surge in infections. "We strongly request that the authorities convince the IOC (International Olympic Committee) that holding the Olympics is difficult and obtain its decision to cancel the Games," the association said in a May 14 open letter to Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga which was posted to its website on Monday. A jump in infections has stoked alarm amid a shortage of medical staff and hospital beds in some areas of the Japanese capital, promoting the government to extend a third state of emergency in Tokyo and several other prefectures until May 31. Doctors would soon face the added difficulty of dealing with heat exhaustion patients during the summer months and if the Olympics contributed to a rise in deaths "Japan will bear the maximum responsibility", it added. Other health experts and medical groups have voiced their concerns about the Olympics, while an online petition calling for the Games to be cancelled was signed by hundreds of thousands of people. Overall, Japan has avoided an explosive spread of the virus experienced by other nations, but the government has come under sharp criticism for its sluggish vaccination roll-out. Only about 3.5% of its population of about 126 million has been vaccinated, according to a Reuters tracker. Underscoring the challenges with the vaccinations, booking systems for mass inoculation sites being launched in Tokyo and Osaka - which started accepting bookings on Monday - were marred by technical glitches. Still, Suga says Japan can host "a safe and secure Olympics" while following appropriate COVID-19 containment measures. Preparations for the July 23-Aug. 8 Games are progressing under tight COVID-19 protocols, such as an athletics test event featuring 420 athletes in early May. But multiple pre-Olympic training camps, including one for the United States' track and field team have been cancelled, and athletes have voiced concerns about the Games taking place in the midst of a global pandemic. Canadian equastrian athlete and gold medalist Eric Lamaze announced on Monday that he had pulled out of being an Olympic candidate, citing personal health concerns. He has been treated for a brain tumor over the past three years. "My health is something that I take very seriously, and I've decided that Tokyo is not the best venue for me," Lamaze said in the statement. "The Olympics are a celebration of the athletes and I don't think we're going to have a true celebration in Tokyo," he added. "It's not the time to celebrate." The Games have already been postponed once due to the pandemic. With cases surging across much of Asia, the World Economic Forum on Monday cancelled its annual meeting of the global elite due to be held in Singapore in August. Under the state of emergency in parts of Japan, bars, restaurants, karaoke parlours and other places serving alcohol will remain closed, although large commercial facilities can re-open under shorter hours. Hard-hit Tokyo and Osaka will continue to keep these larger facilities closed. The number of COVID-19 cases nationwide dropped to 3,680 on Monday, the lowest level since April 26, according to public broadcaster NHK, but the number of heavy infections hit a record high of 1,235, the health ministry said on Tuesday.
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