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[OFF TOPIC] Food & Drinks Thread

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5 minuti fa, phelps ha scritto:

 

they look tasty...

I hope she did appreciate the effort, at least...:p;)

yes, she did :) 

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1 hora atrás, AlFHg disse:

Time ago I did these for my girlfriend :D I don't think they need any presentation

IMG.png


What are these? They look like Swiss rolls but they were baked in a very different way from what I'd expect them to be served (like we do in Brazil). By the way, we call Swiss rolls in Brazil "rocambole".

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10 hours ago, thiago_simoes said:

What's the best selling beverage (preferentially non-alcoholic) unique to your country? In Brazil we all drink guaraná, and even Fanta decided to create their own soda version of the drink.

 

In Mexico, Coca Cola made a similar beverage from guaraná called Senzao some years ago... I liked it when I was in middle school, but after that I found it rather sweet, but that could be from some change in the soda's formula.

 

Spoiler

senzao.jpg.89aa979e804f531c609caf2e464f8df4.jpg

 

In Mexico there are a number of local produced sodas and soft drinks; among the most known are "Jarritos" ("little jugs") which are made from tropical fruits like pinneaple, guava, mandarin, watermelon, tamarind and even hibiscus flower.

 

jarritos.jpg.a8584cb11c07736eb882c64c77703586.jpg

 

Another popular drink, especially among kids is Tonicol, a drink made from vanilla extract

 

tonicol.jpg.f7e96c04d1ab373da54d836a2426ac2e.jpg

 

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1 hora atrás, mrv86 disse:

jarritos.jpg.a8584cb11c07736eb882c64c77703586.jpg


I want them all! Especially the watermelon, tamarind and guava variations. There are local brands in Brazil that market unusual flavors like pineapple and tangerine too. There's even a brand that created a soda made of leaves from a Brazilian plant called chapéu de couro, a rather bizarre choice for a soda variation. The funny thing is that this drink, called Mineirinho, is somewhat popular in the state of Rio de Janeiro.

Mineirinho-Copy.jpg.2b429eafd00792d16111f056c0af281a.jpg

 

@heywoodu, have you drunk Mineirinho?

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1 hour ago, mrv86 said:

 

In Mexico there are a number of local produced sodas and soft drinks; among the most known are "Jarritos" ("little jugs") which are made from tropical fruits like pinneaple, guava, mandarin, watermelon, tamarind and even hibiscus flower.

 

jarritos.jpg.a8584cb11c07736eb882c64c77703586.jpg

Jarritos is pretty well established in California too, but I’ve had and seen it sold in other states. I think it’s better than most American soda brands. Korean soda is also quite available in Southern California 

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“Sport has the power to change the world. It has the power to inspire. Sport can create hope where once there was only despair” - Nelson Mandela

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28 minutes ago, thiago_simoes said:

There's even a brand that created a soda made of leaves from a Brazilian plant called chapéu de couro, a rather bizarre choice for a soda variation. The funny thing is that this drink, called Mineirinho, is somewhat popular in the state of Rio de Janeiro.

 

I would like to try it, I like to experience new flavors :thumbup:

 

As for "Jarritos" I'll try to find whether they are exported to Brazil.

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56 minutos atrás, Olympian1010 disse:

Korean soda is also quite available in Southern California 


Is there any reason for that? 

In Brazil it's not uncommon to find Japanese drinks in a number of select stores. Not really surprising, since the largest Japanese population outside Japan lives in Brazil. I'm especially fond of Calpis. This thing is delicious!

i want it2.jpg

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2 hours ago, thiago_simoes said:

@heywoodu, have you drunk Mineirinho?

Nope, this is the first I ever heard of it :p 

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1 hour ago, thiago_simoes said:


Is there any reason for that? 

In Brazil it's not uncommon to find Japanese drinks in a number of select stores. Not really surprising, since the largest Japanese population outside Japan lives in Brazil. 

Well the state, especially LA is home to Little Sri Lanka, multiple Koreatowns, multiple Chinatowns, Little Armenia (which constitutes one of the biggest minorities in the state), and Orange Country has become Tehran 2.0 in a few areas. LA is so diverse that our voting ballots are offered in 17 languages (and that’s just for the county). California has some very unique immigrant communities. In fact half of my classmates families are first or second generation immigrants in the US. My school in particular has around 50 foreign nationals, and live in a suburb! 

 

My favorite immigrant community in California is Solvang. It’s a town founded by Danish immigrants in one of the most beautiful parts of the state, it’s even been a host to numerous Tour of California stages.

 

So, as you can tell I take a little pride in being a Californian. That also means that I’ve exposed to a lot of foreign food, such as Korean soda, Mexico street vendor food, all types of Asian cuisine, European candy and sandwiches, Midwest barbecue, Poké, Sushi, gelato.

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“Sport has the power to change the world. It has the power to inspire. Sport can create hope where once there was only despair” - Nelson Mandela

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9 ore fa, thiago_simoes ha scritto:


What are these? They look like Swiss rolls but they were baked in a very different way from what I'd expect them to be served (like we do in Brazil). By the way, we call Swiss rolls in Brazil "rocambole".

They are cinnamon and cocoa rolls :)

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