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Totallympics Open International Song Contest 2020


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rybak: "I Want More Traditional Songs"

 

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As long-term TISC supporter, rybak has lead Poland to numerous notable results. This includes an impressive run of three consecutive Top 10 placings (2017 Open - 2018 Open).

 

Poland, however, will not be represented by a single person jury in Holland. For the first time in a long time. WIll this cause them to shift away from their usual far anti-establishment patterns?

 

Q: How do you go about evaluating TISC entries? Do you use a specific system when picking out your Top 12?

A: No, I don't have a specific system, I just listen to all entries, and I choose those ones which sound good for me.

 

Q: And what about the maximum 12 points? Can you recognize it immediately? Or do you take a certain amount of time before deciding on it?

A: Usually there are few songs at the beginning, to which I would want to give 12 points, just like at this contest I had 4 songs which IMO deserved to have my 12 points. I needed this time four listenings to make a final decision about top 4.

 

Q: Do you have a favorite music genre? Is there any genre you would like to hear more of on the TISC stage?

A: I prefer Pop, rock songs and trance music, but time to time I also listen to other music genres, all depends on the current mood. I still listen every day the song which represented Hong Kong at the TISC Special Event.

 

At TISC I would want to hear more traditional songs, like Balkan ballads, folk songs and so on.

 

Q: How important are lyrics to you?

A: Music, sound, rhythm for me are more important than lyrics.

 

Q: And finally... How can we get 12 points from rybak?

A: Well, the answer is simple, choose the song which I will like/love, hints are above.

 

If rybak's musical preferences still feel like a jigsaw puzzle - maybe this will help. Our resident Polish juror has outlined the following entries as favorites during the most recent editions...

 

Spoiler

 

 

 

 

Stay tuned for more user interviews to come, as we count down to TOISC 2020...

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5 days till TISC, 7 days till LoL free agency, 19 days till biathlon season starts, 20 days till quarantine is supposed to end if they don't extend it, 36 days till the end of Eurovision applications and 66 days till Eurovision selection. 

 

My life right now is literally just me waiting for moments that will make me happy and then I go on to wait for the next best thing.

 

Holy fuck do I want life to go back to normal. 

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Vojthas: "Don't Use Electronic Devices Over Instruments"

 

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Unlike rybak, the fellow Polish juror Vojthas is a closed book. We have no data, no idea, no concept of what to expect. All we know is that royals may get some disproportionate advantage in these votes. Neither the Duchess of Sussex nor Princess Nathalie have announced their intent of participation yet, however...

 

Q: How do you go about evaluating TISC entries? Do you use a specific system when picking out your Top 12?

A: During the first listening, I make my first classification. As it appeared there are more than 12 songs, to which I would give points without the feel of voting for something I don't like, I haven't listened to the other ones. Then made my final choice after second listening of all of them and then partially listening of those under the biggest question mark of the final placement, which is usually a matter of "tie-breaking" between two or three - either very similar or totally opposite, which is always hard to compare.*

 

*I could tell you more about the specific case of this contest, but that would need to be done after the voting closes.

 

Q: And what about the maximum 12 points? Can you recognize it immediately? Or do you take a certain amount of time before deciding on it?

A: During first listening, I usually know which ones are the strongest candidates for it. Of course, you never know, if this is the best until you get to listen to all of them, but I know, which one will be hard to beat.

 

Q: Do you have a favorite music genre? Is there any genre you would like to hear more of on the TISC stage?

A: Yes, I like classic rock, in quite a hard way, even on the edge of metal, but also in a ballad or pop-rock version. I am also a fan of 80s disco and euro disco specifically. These are two totally different genres, but I really like them both.

 

Q: How important are lyrics to you?

A: Not really important, when it comes to voting unless it's really vulgar - but in 99,9% offensive lyrics go along with music genres that will never get my points. When it comes to listening to music outside the contest, I naturally have a sentiment to the songs which tell the stories similar to my owns. Usually, they end up in being translated to Polish by myself, sometimes with a slight adaptation to stories of my life. But don't ask me about titles - they're quite personal.

 

Q: And finally... How can we get 12 points from Vojthas?

A: If you're in the style of 70s or 80s and do not use other electronic devices over instruments - you got it.

 

 

Stay tuned for more user interviews to come, as we count down to TOISC 2020...

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:BIH Bosnia & Herzegovina :BIH 

Zabranjeno Pušenje (in English, No Smoking) is a Bosnian rock band formed in Sarajevo in 1980. The group's musical style primarily consists of a distinctive garage rock sound with folk influences, often featuring innovative production and complex storytelling. Currently, the band consists of founding member, vocalist and guitarist Sejo Sexon, longtime drummer Branko Trajkov, guitarist Toni Lović, bassist Dejan Orešković, and violinist and keyboardist Robert Boldižar.

 

Zabranjeno Pušenje - Možeš imat' moje tijelo

 

 

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1 hour ago, dcro said:

Vojthas: "Don't Use Electronic Devices Over Instruments"

 

 

 

Q: And finally... How can we get 12 points from Vojthas?

A: If you're in the style of 70s or 80s and do not use other electronic devices over instruments - you got it.

 

 

Stay tuned for more user interviews to come, as we count down to TOISC 2020...

Oooooh, I really wanna interject on this.

 

In order to hire a competent producer that would make your song from scratch (we're talking about a single song here) you usually spend from 800-1200 Euros, which is actually above minimal monthly wage for everyone in Eastern Europe. Usually you are expected to send it off to some other guy for the mixing & mastering, which would be another 200-300 euros.

 

Here you are already not getting a return unless your Spotify or Youtube is in the millions. 

 

Imagine then that you need to hire additional people that would come to the studio, spend hours hooking up & recording their instruments and then you end up paying the drummer, the bassist, the guitarist, the pianist, if you're very adventurous, go for a cello or a violin and so on, so on.

 

There are only a few ways that you can actually survive with live instruments in this industry:

 

1. You are mega rich and can afford everything

2. You have a lot of passionate musician friends that want you to succeed and will come over to the studio to record the instruments for your song for nothing in exchange

3. You are dating a producer or you have a producer that is your best friend, then no studio costs

4. Your producer is secretly a multi-instrumental talent that can play everything and owns every instrument and records it himself at the studio

5. The artist is secretly a multi-instrumental talent and can himself/herself record every instrument in the studio

6. You have a mega rich manager that can afford everything / under contract with a label

7. You are your own producer and are a multi-instrumental talent (ex. Charlie Puth)

 

Let alone, most studios are now nearly fully digital, I don't think I've seen an acoustic piano in a studio in the past five years, so even if you're a great pianist, most likely you're going to be playing on a digital piano at best if not a midi 4 octave keyboard. 

 

The most popular instrument that has a good chance to be recorded live is actually an acoustic or electric guitar, the bass tends to be pitched on a keyboard and a rare sight to use live drums. 

 

In my case, my producer is a drummer and a guitarist, so there are some live elements going into my music. He's also better at piano than me so that's kinda embarrassing :p When I was younger, I always thought that every single one of my songs would be live instruments only, because that's the only real way to make music. But time is money and mostly everyone leans towards digital production nowadays. Violins, cello and brass instruments though sound a bit trash in digital form, so it's why you're hearing it less and less in pop music unless we're coming back to points 1, 6 and 7. 

 

There's another heap of monetary trouble if you can't write your own music :lol:

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Forgot to mention that if you're in a band, then you have the instruments on hand and you can even split studio costs, so most of these struggles mentioned there mostly affect solo acts that have to hire musicians for every single live event anyways. 

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