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  1. The first qualifying procedures have been released for Paris 2024. With thirty-two sports split into forty-seven "disciplines" in Paris 2024, the first eighteen disciplines in thirteen sports have been released. They are: Archery, Basketball (Basketball and Basketball 3x3), Boxing, Breaking, Gymnastics (Artistic, Rhythmic, and Trampoline), Handball, Hockey, Modern Pentathlon, Rugby Sevens, Shooting, Triathlon, Volleyball (Beach Volleyball and Volleyball), and Wrestling. Totallympics News will provide coverage on each qualification system as and when it is released. In this post, we will have a look at the ten qualification procedures already released. Archery Archery retains five events, with a men's and women's individual team, and a mixed team. Twelve nations per gender, including hosts France, will qualify a team, with the three members of the team also participating in the individual events. The remaining 28 spots, including two universality places, will be earned on an individual basis, with at most one per NOC. There is no separate qualifying for the mixed team, with entry automatic for every NOC with at least one athlete per gender. The team section has been changed, with a ranking and a continental system added. The 2023 World Archery Championship (Berlin, GER, 28 Jul-6 Aug 2023) will earn just three spots, down from eight. Three of those spots will go to the winners of Continental Championships (exactly which events are yet to be announced) for Europe, Asia, and the Americas. There will still be a Final World Team Qualification Tournament (date and location to be announced) for three places. Finally, two places will be earned for a Team World Ranking List, the date which will count will be announced at a later date. The winners of the mixed team competition at five Continental Games will qualify one individual spot for both genders. These are the 2022 Asian Games (Huangzhou, CHN, 10-25 Sep 2022), the 2023 European Games (Krakow, POL, 21 Jun-2 Jul 2023), the 2023 Pan-American Games (Santiago, CHI, 20 Oct-5 Nov 2023), and the 2023 Pacific Games (Honiara, SOL, Nov 19-1 Dec 2023). The 2023 African Games (Accra, GHA, Dates to be announced) are also meant to be part of this, but as of right now, archery is not on the programme. If this remains the case, one extra place per gender will be available for the Individual Qualifying Tournament. The remaining twenty-one places per gender are earned individually. Three will be earned at the 2023 World Archery Championship, two each will be earned at three Continental Games (the Asian Games, European Games, and Pan-American Games), and ten will be earned at five Continental Qualification Tournaments (which tournaments exactly will be announced by 31 December 2022): three for Europe, two each for Asia, the Americas, and Africa, and one for Oceania. Finally two (plus the potential reallocated African Games spot) will be earned at the Final World Individual Qualification Tournament (date and location to be announced). This system is similar to the one used for 2020, although more priority is given to Continental Games than Continental Qualification Tournaments. All-in-all, a new system for 2020. Artistic Gymnastics Artistic Gymnastics retains its fourteen events from Tokyo 2020, with eight men's events (Team, All-Around, Floor Exercise, Pommel Horse, Rings, Vault, Parallel Bars, and Horizontal Bars) and six women's events (Team, All-Around, Vault, Uneven Bars, Balance Beam, Floor Exercise). The total amount of athletes has been reduced however, with 96 spots per gender, down from 98. One spot per gender will be guaranteed to the host nation, France, although the team is considered strong enough to get at least one place for each gender anyway. A team of five athletes can qualify for an NOC: these five can then choose which individual events they want to take place in. An NOC without a team qualified can bring at most three athletes. This is a big change from 2020, where there were teams made up of four. Twelve teams will qualify per gender, with a similar format to 2016: The top three teams qualifying in the 2022 World Championships (Liverpool, GBR, 29 Oct-6 Nov 2022) and the remaining nine in the 2023 World Championships (Antwerp, BEL, 1-8 Oct 2023). However, the individual qualification places (34 per gender) have a new format in 2024: remember, these can only be earned by athletes not in a team. The top 3 teams at the 2023 World Championships not to qualify will gain one individual athlete per gender. The top eight male and top fourteen female All-Around athletes at the 2023 World Championships will gain a quota as well: only one place per NOC can be gained here. The winner of the six male and four female Apparatus finals at the 2023 World Championships will also gain a quota. The top two in each apparatus at the 2024 FIG World Cup (Athens, GRE, 15-17 Mar 2024; Pesaro, ITA, 22-24 Mar 2024; Sofia, BUL, 12-14 Apr 2024; Baku, AZE, 19-21 Apr 2024; Tashkent, UZB, 26-28 Apr 2024) will gain a spot: so twelve men and eight women. Finally, the winner (or highest-placed eligible athlete) of All-Around competitions in 2024 Continental Championships (a total of five for each gender) will take the final spots. It is yet to be announced which events will count, but the FIG prefers them to take place from April to May 2024. If, as expected, the hosts reallocate their place, it will be an extra place earned at the 2023 World Championships for the All-Around category, effectively boosting that to having nine male and fifteen female athletes qualifying. Basketball Basketball retains two twelve-team tournaments, just like Tokyo 2020. The qualification system for eleven teams each (as one spot goes to hosts France) is the same, differing however between men and women. For men, seven teams qualify from the 2023 FIBA Basketball World Cup (Various cities, IDN, JPN, PHI, Aug 25-Sep 10 2023): the top two teams from America and Europe and the top team from Africa, Asia, and Oceania. Qualification is in progress for that event. The remaining four spots will be earned in 2024 at FIBA Olympic Qualification Tournaments (Date and location tbc), which will include nineteen teams from the World Cup and five from Olympic pre-qualifying tournaments: the winners of each of the four tournaments, with six teams each, will earn the final spot. For women, only the champion of the 2022 FIBA Women's Basketball World Cup (Sydney, AUS, 22 Sep-1 Oct 2022) will qualify: the qualification procedure for that is finished. The remaining ten places will be earned at FIBA Olympic Qualification Tournaments (Date and location tbc): there will be four groups of four, with the top three qualifying, although France and the Women's World Cup champions will be included: in the groups with those two, only two places will be earned. This is no change from the Tokyo 2020 system. Basketball 3x3 Basketball 3x3 retains its two 8-team tournaments from 2020. There is a change to the system (which is the same for men and women). Now, only the top three teams (down from four) qualify a spot on the 3x3 Federation Ranking List of 1 November 2023. There are now two 2024 Universality-driven Qualification Tournaments (locations and dates for both TBC), with eight teams in both and one winner, and finally, a 2024 FIBA Olympic Qualifying Tournament that is still worth three places. Also, if France don't qualify a place, then whichever genders team is ranked higher takes a ranking place off the lowest-qualified team. Beach Volleyball Beach Volleyball retains a men and a women's 24-team tournament (max 2 teams per NOC) from 2020. With one spot to the hosts, there are 23 teams qualifying per NOC. However, they have removed a qualification tournament that gained two spots, with two more teams earned by world ranking. Firstly, the winner of the 2023 FIVB Beach Volleyball Senior World Championships (date and location TBC) gets a place. Then, the top seventeen (or eighteen should the host spot get reallocated) teams of the Olympic Ranking List of 10 June 2024 will get a spot. Finally, the winners of five Beach Volleyball Continental Qualification Events will earn spots. These dates will be confirmed by 31 May 2022. The final phase of these will be hosted in June 2024, after the publication of the ranking. A simple system to follow. Boxing Boxing has had a switch from 2020. That year, there were eight male weight classes, and five female ones, but now there are seven male weight classes (51, 57, 63.5, 71, 80, 92 and +92kg weight limits) and six female ones (50, 54, 57, 60, 66, and 75kg weight limits). There will be 124 athletes in each gender (compared to 206 men and 80 women in Tokyo), a total of 248, which is down from 286 in 2020. Each event will still have at most one athlete per NOC. To breakdown by event: Women's 54 and 66kg: 24 places Women's 50kg: 22 places Men's 63.5 and 71kg, Women's 57kg: 20 places Men's 57 and 80kg, Women's 75kg: 18 places Men's 51, 92, and +92kg, and Women's 60kg: 16 places The first event in the calendar are the 2023 IBA World Boxing Championships (Tashkent, UZB, dates TBC) and 2023 IBA Women's World Championships (dates and locations TBC). The finalist of each event will earn a spot: as there are thirteen men's and ten women's categories, this means most events will actually get four spots: the Men's +92kg and Women's 57 and 60kg will get two spots. Then, the Olympic Ranking Lists of 31 December 2023 will earn six spots per event. France are guaranteed at least four men and at least three women, and there are also four male and five universality spots: the confirmation of these will affect the exact amount of quotas up for grabs in the Olympic Ranking Lists of 31 March 2024. Finally, in May 2024, a World Qualification Tournament (locations and dates TBC) will earn two spots for each event. A new-look system for the new-look IBA. Breaking The new sport of Breaking has sixteen participants per gender (at most two per NOC). One spot goes to hosts France, and two will be earned by way of "universality", meaning there are thirteen qualification spots. The winner of the WDSF World Championship (Leuven, BEL, 22-24 Sep 2023) will earn a spot as will the winner of five Continental Games/Championships (although exactly which Games or Championships are still to be confirmed). Finally seven athletes in each gender (or eight if the French spot is reallocated) will earn a spot at the Olympic Qualifier Series. Handball Handball retains a 12-team tournament for both genders from 2020. The system has not changed for 2020, with eleven qualification spots each once the host spot is allocated to France. The first spot goes to the winner of the IHF Men's World Championship 2023 (POL and SWE, 11-29 Jan 2023) and the winner of the IHF Women's World Championship 2023 (DEN, NOR, and SWE, exact dates TBC). The winners of four Continental Qualification Events: for men the Pan-American Games, an Asian event pencilled in for autumn 2023, the 2024 European Championship (GER, 10-28 Jan 2024) and the January 2024 African Championship (location and exact dates tbc); and for women the Pan-American Games, an Asian event also in autumn 2023, the 2022 European Women's Handball Championship (MNE, MKD, SLO, 4-20 Nov 2022), and an African event currently meant to take place in 2023. The final six places will be earned at three Olympic Qualifying Tournaments (dates and locations TBC) that will be held in March 2024 for men and the next month for women. A familiar qualifier for a familiar Olympic sport. Hockey Another team sport returning from 2020, there is a 12-team tournament for both genders. Once France get their spot, eleven places are earned in qualifiers for each gender. Unlike 2020, the system is the same for men and women. Five spots are earned by winning Continental Qualifications: these being the 2022 Asian Games, 2023 Pan-American Games, the 2023 African Hockey "Road to Paris" Championships (dates and locations TBC), the 2023 EuroHockey Championships (Monchengladbach, GER, exact dates TBC), and the 2023 Oceania Cup (dates and locations TBC). The top three teams in two FIH Olympic Qualification Tournaments (dates and locations to be announced on 6 November 2023) will win the final spots, a change from 2020 when play-offs were used. Modern Pentathlon Modern Pentathlon retains 36 athletes in each gender: at most two per NOC. With one host spot and two invitational spots, there are 33 qualifying spots per gender, and the system is the same for both, being mostly similar to the 2020 system. The winner of the 2023 UIPM World Cup Final (date and locations TBC) will earn a spot, but twenty (at most one per NOC) will be from various Continental Championships (date and locations TBC): eight for Europe, five for Asia and for Pan America (with one spot for first place, one for the next two North Americans (which includes Central America and the Caribbean) and one for the next two South Americans), and one for Africa and Oceania. Three spots will be earned at the 2023 UIPM Pentathlon World Championships (Bath, GBR, dates TBC), and finally, six will be earned through the UIPM Olympic Pentathlon World Ranking List of 17 June 2024. Rhythmic Gymnastics Rhythmic Gymnastics is a female-only sport, and there are now only 94 athletes, instead of 96. There are still fourteen group (of five, so 70 athletes), but now just 24 individuals, down from 26. There are fourteen teams, including France, with thirteen qualification spots. The top three teams at the 2022 World Championships (Sofia, BUL, 14-18 Sep 2022) will get a spot, as will the top five teams (or six should the French spot be reallocated) at the 2023 World Championships (Valencia, ESP, 21-27 Aug 2023). The final five spots will go to the winners of the 2024 Continental Championships, dates and locations of which are to be confirmed. Unlike artistic gymnastics, the group competition is not integrated in qualifying with the individual one. With 26 places available (at most two per NOC), including one host spot and one universality place, there are 24 qualification spots to fight for. The top three individuals at the 2022 World Championships, the top fourteen (or fifteen should the French spot be reallocated) at the 2023 World Championships, and the winners of the five 2024 Continental Championships get a spot. A relatively simple system to follow, then. Rugby Sevens Rugby Sevens retains its 12-team tournaments from 2020: that includes a host spot each. The eleven qualification spots are the same as in 2020. The top four teams in the 2022-3 World Rugby Sevens World Series, the details of which will be announced by 30 June 2022 corresponding to each gender will gain a spot, as will the winners of six Regional Association Olympic Qualification Tournaments in 2023 and a Final Olympic Repechage Tournament which should happen in 2024. Details and locations for all events are to be confirmed. Shooting Shooting retains thirteen events from 2020, although now there are only 170 athletes per gender, instead of 180. The programme is slightly changed. The men's and women's events are the same (10m Air Rifle, 50m 3 Positions, 10m Air Pistol, 25m Rapid Fire Pistol (Men)/25m Pistol (Women), Trap, and Skeet) while the Mixed Team in 10m Air Rifle and 10m Air Pistol also remain, although the Mixed Team Trap is replaced for a mixed Team Skeet event. There is no mixed team qualification: instead those with one man and one woman in each event can enter a corresponding mixed team: at most two teams per NOC. At most twelve men and at most twelve women per NOC can qualify, and at most two athletes per individual event per NOC can qualify. There are 25 qualification spots per event, with a host country spot, one universality spot (two in the air rifle and air pistol events) and one earned at the Olympic Qualification Ranking of 9 June 2024. In the Air Rifle and Air Pistol events, four spots are earned at the 2022 World Rifle and Pistol Championship (Cairo, EGY, 12-25 Oct 2022). One spot will be earned at the 2022 CAT Championship (Lima, PER, 9-16 Nov 2022). Two spots are earned at the 2023 European 10m Championship (Tallinn, EST, 5-15 Mar 2023). One spot is earned at the 2023 European Games, one at the 2023 Pan-American Games, and another two at the 2023 Asia Championship (Changwon, KOR, exact dates tbc), four at the 2023 World Championship (14-31 Aug 2023, location TBC), two at the 2023 Africa Championship (Cairo, EGY, exact dates 1-10 Oct 2023), two at the 2024 European 10m Championship (Gyor, HUN, exact dates TBC), one at the 2024 CAT Championship, two at the 2024 Asia Rifle and Pistol Championship (date and location tbc), two from a 2024 Final Olympic Qualification Championship (date and location TBC) and one from an Oceania Championship (date and location TBC). For the 25m and 50m events, two spots are earned at the 2022 European 25m/50m Championship (Wroclaw, POL, 5-18 Sep 2022). Four spots are earned at the 2022 World Rifle and Pistol Championship, one at the 2022 CAT Championship, one at the 2023 European Games, one (two for 25m events) at the 2023 Pan-American Games, two at the 2023 Asia Championship, four at the 2023 World Championship, one at the 2023 Africa Championship, two at the 2024 European 25m/50m Qualification Event (dates and locations tbc), one at the 2024 CAT Championship, two at the 2024 Asia Rifle and Pistol Championship, two from a 2024 Final Olympic Qualification Championship and two (one for 25m events) from the mysterious Oceania Championship. The trap and skeet events will be the first event to get underway, with the 2022 European Shotgun Championships (Larnaca, CYP, 24 Aug-12 Sep 2022) earning two spots. Four spots will be earned at the 2022 World Shotgun Championship (Osijek, CRO, 22 Sep-11 Oct 2022), one at the 2022 CAT Championship, one at the 2023 European Shotgun Championship (Leobersdorf, AUT, 25 Jul-6 Aug 2023), two at the 2023 Pan-American Games, two at the 2023 Asia Championship, four at the 2023 World Championship, one at the 2023 Africa Championship, one at the 2024 European Shotgun Championship (Dates and locations TBC), one at the 2024 CAT Championship, two at the 2024 Asia Shotgun Championship (Date and locations TBC), two at the 2024 Final Olympic Qualification Championship and one from the Oceania Championship. The main headline is the removal of World Cup events, and remember that quotas earned in one event can be used in a second as long as the athlete is eligible in both (i.e. gets the minimum entry standard). The headline is the removal of the World Cup events, which is sure to split opinion. Trampoline The only form of gymnastics not to have its quotas cut, it retains sixteen men and sixteen women in 2024. There can be at most two places per NOC, but only three NOCs per gender can earn two places. The highest eight ranked athletes per gender in the 2023 World Championships (Birmingham, GBR, 9-12 Nov 2023). The remaining eight spaces will be won at the 2023-4 Trampoline Individual World Cup Series, dates and locations of which are to be confirmed. However, if a continent doesn't have a place then a spot will be allocated to a relevant 2024 Continental Championship. A host spot and a universality spot may also be taken away from the World Cup series. Triathlon Triathlon avoids any cuts from 2020 to 2024, with 55 athletes from each gender: at most three per NOC. There is a men's, women's, and mixed team event. There are no qualification spots for mixed teams, instead, any NOC with at least two in each gender can enter a mixed team. However, there are some mixed team events that do qualify two places per gender, thus guaranteeing a place in the mixed relay. This includes an automatic spot for the host nation, a spot for the winner of the 2022 World Triathlon Mixed Relay Championships (Montreal, CAN, 26 Jun 2022), a spot for the winner of the 2023 World Triathlon Mixed Relay Championships (Hamburg, GER, date TBC), six spots on offer from the World Triathlon Mixed Relay Ranking of 25 March 2024, and two spaces on offer at the 2024 Mixed Relay Olympic Qualification Event (dates and location TBC). All 31 individual spots (earned separately for each gender) are earned for the World Triathlon Olympic Qualification Ranking of 27 May 2024: the top 26, and then the highest next athlete per continent. Finally, there are two universality places. Just like 2020, there is a mostly ranking-based system for Olympic qualifying. Volleyball Volleyball retains two twelve-team tournaments from 2020 to 2024: so eleven qualification spots once France are taken out. Two spots each are earned in three 2023 Olympic Qualification Tournaments (in each gender, locations tbc: 16-24 Sep 2023 for women, 30 Sep-8 Oct 2023 for men), but in a major shake-up, the remaining five will be earned based on World Rankings (17 June 2024 for women and 24 June 2024 for men). This will be a massively controversial shakeup: with supporters and detractors. Wrestling Finally, we come to Wrestling, a sport for which both disciplines (Greco-Roman and Freestyle) have had their system released together. Greco-Roman is a men-only event, with 96 men participating in six weight classes (60, 67, 77, 87, 97, and 130kg), and 96 of each gender in Freestyle: six weight classes for both men (57, 65, 74, 86, 97, and 125kg) and women (50, 53, 57, 62, 68, and 76kg). There are sixteen spots per event. The top five athletes for each event at the 2023 Senior World Championships (Krasnoyarsk, RUS, 16-24 Sep 2023, obviously take that with a pinch of salt) gain a place. Then, the top two athletes at four 2024 Continental Qualification Tournaments (African & Oceania Tournament, 22-24 Mar 2024, European Tournament, 4-7 Apr 2024, Asian Tournament, 12-14 Apr 2024, Pan-American Tournament, 19-21 Apr 2024, locations all TBC) gain a place. Finally, the top three athletes for each event at the 2024 World Qualification Tournament (9-12 May 2024, location TBC) will earn a place. Plenty of things to debate: it seems in general, there is a move towards rankings-oriented systems, although there is a lot of variation. Let's see if this trend continues for other sports. Patrick Green Writer, Totallympics News
    6 points
  2. History was made today as Sofia Raffaeli became the first Italian to win gold in the women’s individual all-around at the Rhythmic Gymnastics World Championships. The event also doubled as the first Olympic qualification opportunity for the rhythmic individual all-around event where the top three athletes qualified their nation to the games. The 2022 Rhythmic Gymnastics World Championships are currently being held in Sofia, Bulgaria from September 14th to September 18th 2022. The qualification round was topped by Italy’s Sofia Raffaeli whom finished with a total of 98.850. In the qualification round only the three best apparatus scores are counted towards your overall total. Raffaeli was the top performer in the ball and ribbon. The top performer in the hoop and clubs was Bulgaria’s Stiliana Nikolova whom finished just behind Raffaeli with a score of 98.200. The pair had an over 2-point gap ahead of third place Darja Varfolomeev of Germany. In the final, all four apparatus performances are counted towards your total, meaning there was no room for error. The top three from the qualification round continue to be the best performers. After the first two rotations Varfolomeev held a 1.050 lead over Nikolova and Raffaeli. However, a poor ribbon by Nikolova essentially knocked her out of contention for gold leaving Varfolomeev and Raffaeli to battle for gold in the final rotation. Varfolomeev held a 1.000 lead and had to compete in the ribbon while Raffaeli’s final apparatus was the ball. Varfolomeev had a 32.450 performance in the ribbon, but Raffaeli was able to counter with a 34.250 on the ball, allowing her to win gold with a total score of 133.250. She finished first in the hoop, ball and ribbon. Varfolomeev finished in the silver medal position by winning the clubs and finishing with a total score of 132.450. Bronze and the final Olympic quota went to Nikolova who finished with a total of 128.800. Raffaeli had a breakout season in 2022 where she won gold in the individual all-around at 3/5 World Cup events. She also added many apparatus medals to her collection including three golds (hoop, ball & ribbon) and one bronze (clubs) at this World Championships. The next Olympic opportunity for nations to qualify in this event will be at the 2023 World Championships.
    4 points
  3. The first eight spots in Paris 2024 Shooting will be earned over the coming weeks at the 2022 European Championship (Shotgun) takes place in Larnaca, Cyprus. A modest "hidden gem" on the island nation's south-eastern coast, Larnaca is the country's third largest city, although the Larnaca Olympic Shooting Range is actually in the nearby village of Tersefanou, with a population of about 1300. Plenty of events will take place, but four of them matter for Paris 2024 qualification: the Men's and Women's Trap and Skeet events. The top two athletes will earn at most one place for their NOC (so the same country cannot snag both quotas). The opening ceremony will take place on Thursday, with Trap qualification on Friday and Saturday before the finals later on Saturday, with the women at 14:30 local time and the men at 16:30. After that, a few non-Olympic events take place but the Skeet Qualification begins on 8 September, before continuing on 9 September. Later on 9 September the finals will take place, again with the women beginning at 14:30 and the men at 16:30. Qualifying one man and one woman in Skeet will also guarantee a place in the Mixed Team event. In Lonato del Garda in 2019, eventual Olympic champion Czech Republic's Jiří Lipták and Great Britain's Aaron Heading earned a spot in the Men's Trap, with Greece's Nikolas Mavrommatis and Cyprus' Dmitris Konstantinou earning a spot in the Skeet. On the women's side, the ROC's Daria Semianova and San Marino's Alessandra Perilli (who won bronze in Tokyo) earned a spot in the Trap with the Czech Republic's Barbora Šumová and Ukraine's Iryna Mavlochiko earning a spot in the Skeet. However, this time, the European Shotgun championship is top of the pecking order (Shooting quota places have priority based on chronological order) rather than somewhere in the middle. The European Shotgun Confederation (ESC) has not provided a start list, but noted that "All members of the European Shooting Confederation are invited to participate without any exception", implying that Russian and Belarusian athletes will be able to compete. Some big names are expected to compete however: in Tokyo 2020, all three men's trap medallists (including champion Lipták), two women's trap medallists and the silver medallists in both skeet events were Europeans, as were the top two in the mixed trap team. An article on the IOC website confirms at least six Olympic medalists will be present: Jesper Hansen (Silver, Men's Trap, Denmark), Matthew Coward Holley (Bronze, Men's Skeet, Great Britain), Fátima Gálvez, Alberto Fernández (both Gold, Mixed Trap, Spain), Gianmarco Berti, and Alessandra Perilli (both Silver, Mixed Trap, San Marino; Perilli also won bronze in the individual trap event). With only two spots up for grabs in Larnaca per event, there will be stiff competition.
    4 points
  4. The victory of the hosts brought the team event of dressage at the FEI Wrold Championship in Herning to a conclusion. Denmark shared the podium with Great Britain and Germany. Alltogether seven teams secured a place for the Paris 2024 Olympics. The Grand Prix have been held for two days with two athletes achieving a result above 80% - Cathrine Laudrup-Dufour on Vamos Amigos (81,864%) and Charlotte Fry on Glamourdale (80,838%). They were the leaders of the teams battling for the gold. The success was on the hosts' side with Nanna Merrald Rasmussen on Blue Hors Zack (76,724%) and Carina Cassøe Krüth on Heiline's Danciera (76,863%) beating the Brits, where Fry was joined by Charlotte Dujardin on Imhotep (77,407%) and Gareth Hughes on Classic Briolinca (75,978%). The podium was completed by the title defending Germans with Ingrid Klimke on Franzikus having their result dropped as the worst in the team (75,683%) the result of 230,791% was achieved by Isabell Werth on DSP Quantaz (77,127%), Bejamin Werndl on Famoso OLD (77,003%) and Frederic Wandres on Duke of Britain FRH (76,661%). Beside the medallists, the three next teams also secured a place in the Paris 2024 Olympic team event (as well as team members starting in the individual competition). These are Sweden, Netherlands (including Dinja van Liere on Hermes - third pair of the Grand Prix with 78,835%) and USA. Another quota went to team of Australia, placed eighth, being the best from the Group G of South East Asia and Oceania with Japan in 15th and New Zealand eliminated as Gaylene Lennard's Jax Johnson haven't passed the inspection and the team had no reserve of their three-pair team. The next medal events are to be held on Monday with dressage Grand Prix Special (individual only) and the non-Olympic vaulting Squad and Individual medals to be given. The next Olympic quotas will be distributed during the jumping team final on Friday the 12th. Author: Wojciech Nowakowski, Totallympics Photo: © FEI/Leanjo de Koster
    4 points
  5. Hello all, As qualification systems are starting to be released for the 2024 Olympic Games in Paris, Totallympics is reviving its news section. Founded in 2020 as "Qualifying to the Games", the section was put on hold in 2021. It has rebranded to "Totallympics News" with an aim to publish regular articles leading up to Paris 2024 and beyond. In the past, this was more in the style of a blog, with irregular articles mostly published when a writer had a whim to write on a topic interesting them. The aim of this project is to provide a more comprehensive news section to compliment the forum. There is no sports news site currently has a primary focus on Olympic qualifications, and therefore we can help fill that gap. I hope people continue to use and enjoy Totallympics, and if you are interested in helping in this project, please contact the site admin @Sindo. Patrick Green Writer, Totallympics News
    4 points
  6. While the 2022 European Shotgun Championships continue in Larnaca, Cyprus, another blue ribbon shooting event with places in Paris up for grabs is taking place in a very different European city. Wrocław is the capital of Poland's southwestern Lower Silesian Voivodeship, with about 650,000 people calling it home. The city will be hosting the 2022 European 25m/50m Shooting Championships, with places at the 2024 Olympic Games on the line. Hosted at the shooting range of Polish top-flight football club Śląsk Wrocław, which also has top-tier teams in women's football and handball as well as being the reigning Polish basketball champion. The top two places (with the stipulation that the same country can't win both places) in four events will earn a spot for their country at the 2024 Olympics: the 50m Rifle 3 Positions for both genders, the Men's Rapid Fire Pistol and the Women's 25m Pistol. The first week of competition will be dedicated to junior competitions which do not earn quota places, but preliminary competition for the Olympic events starts on 12 September for all events apart from the Women's 50m Rifle 3 Positions, which starts on 13 September. On 14 September, the finals will take place: firstly the Women's 25m Pistol at 11:00 local time, before the Men's Rapid Fire Pistol at 17:00 and the Men's 50m Rifle 3 Positions at 19:00. The Women's 50m Rifle 3 Positions final will take place on 15 September at 17:00. It is too early for a start list, but there is guaranteed to be a range of talent on show. At Tokyo 2020, out of the twelve medallists in these events, seven were European, although four of these were Russian and will not be competing. The other three Europeans to medal in these events were Men's Rapid Fire Pistol champion Jean Quiquampoix of France, Men's 50m Rifle 3 Positions bronze medallist Milenko Sebić of Serbia, and champion in the Women's 50m Rifle 3 Positions event Nina Christen of Switzerland. While finding information on participation is not the easiest, the Swiss federation has confirmed that Christen will compete, so we will see at least one Olympic champion. This event has a different priority than it did in the Tokyo cycle, coming first in the schedule for shooters in this event. In the Tokyo Games, it was somewhere in the middle of the calendar. The Czech Republic and Italy got a place in the Men's 50m Rifle 3 Positions thanks to Petr Nymburský and Lorenzo Bacci, while in the Women's event it was Belarus' Maria Martynova and Denmark's Stine Nielsen. In the Men's Rapid Fire Pistol Italy's Riccardo Mazzetti and Azerbaijan's Ruslan Lunev earned a spot, while in the Women's 25m Pistol both places went to France thanks to Mathilde Lamolle and Celine Goberville, something that would be impossible this time around.
    3 points
  7. The Czech Republic's Jiri Liptak starred in a wonderful two days of Trap action at the European Championships (Shotgun) in Larnaca, Cyprus. With the top two in both the Men's and Women's Trap earning spots at Paris 2024, there was something extra motivating these athletes in addition to the potential of European glory. A total of one hundred athletes entered the qualification stage, although thirteen of these were not eligible to reach the final and in it for ranking points only. With five rounds of 25 targets each, the top eight would qualify. Tokyo 2020 champion Liptak lead with 123 hits, with Sweden's Rickard Levin-Andersson second with 122. Third would be decided by shootoff as Great Britain's Nathan Hales and Cyprus's Andreas Makri were tied for 121, while fifth would also be decided by shoot-off to decide between France's Clement Borgue, GB's Matthew John Coward-Holley, and Portugal's Armelim Felipe Rodrigues, who were all on 120 points. Most importantly, the eighth and final spot would also be decided by shoot-off, as Croatians Anton Glasnovic and Francesco Ravalico were tied on 119 points with Teemu Antero Ruutana of Finland and Erik Varga of Slovakia. The Czech Republic's Vladimir Stepan also got 119 points but was ineligible to make the final as a 'ranking points only' (RPO) athlete. Makri got the better of Hales in the shootoff to come third, while in the shoot-off for fifth Rodrigues with six got ahead of Coward-Holley with five and Borgue with none. Glasnovic hit three targets to beat out Ruutana on two and Ravalico and Varga on one to make the next round. Here, there would be two ranking matches of four athletes each, with the top two making the medal match. The first match was made up of Bourgue, Liptak, Makri, and Rodrigues; there would be twenty-five shots, although the athlete in last after fifteen would be eliminated. That happened to be Makri with ten, while it was a tight race in front: Liptak on fourteen, Rodrigues on thirteen, and Bourgue on twelve. But Bourgue missed his next three shots and could only post a total of nineteen, while Liptak (22) and Rodrigues (21) advanced to the final. In the other match, comprised of Coward-Holley, Glasnovic, Hales, and Levin-Andersson; after fifteen it was Glasnovic that was eliminated with eleven, with Hales in front with thirteen and both Coward-Holley and Levin-Andersson on twelve. But Levin-Andersson recovered, only missing one of his final ten shots to post a score of 21, tying with Hales, meaning Olympic bronze medallist Coward-Holley would not advance. In the medal match, there would be thirty-five shots, with last place eliminated after fifteen and again after twenty-five. After fifteen shots Rodrigues was eliminated with ten hits; both Levin-Andersson and Hales had twelve, but something special was in the works as Liptak had all fifteen. With the Czech seemingly uncatchable, the next ten shots would be crucial to decide who got the Paris spot. Both of them hit their next five perfectly, but both missed one shot. Tied for 21 points, they were separated by their score in the Ranking Match. However, as this was also equal, this meant they were separated by their score in the qualification match, and Levin-Andersson survived: a true reflection that every shot matters. But the Swede would have to settle for silver: while he was battling with Hales, Liptak had extended his perfect run: with five shots to go the Czech led 30-25. That meant he just needed to get the next shot to guarantee it and he did, a "golden hit" stopping the contest early and winning gold with a perfect 31 out of 31 in the final. The quotas then went to the Czech Republic and Sweden. On the women's side, it was a somewhat less crowded field, with forty-five athletes, three of whom were RPO. Italy's Silvana Stanco got 119 hits in qualifying, with Portugal's Maria Ines Coelho de Barros and Italy's Giulia Grassia tied for 118. France's Carole Cormenier, Lucy Charlotte Hall of Great Britain, and Jessica Rossi of Italy were tied for fourth with 117 points, while two Spaniards: Fatima Galvez and Mar Molne Magrina were tied for seventh with 116. Grassia hit six targets in the shootoff ahead of Coelho de Barros with five to confirm an Italian 1-2, while Hall won her shoot-off for fourth with three targets ahead of Cormenier on two and Rossi on one. Galvez hit one target to beat Molne Magrina on none. This meant that both European medallists in Tokyo 2020: champion Zuzana Rehak Stefecekova of Slovakia (10th, 114) and bronze medallist Alessandra Perilli of San Marino (24th, 110) were casualties of the qualification stage. The first ranking match was made up of Coelho de Barros, Cormenier, Galvez, and Stanco. After fifteen it was the French athlete who was eliminated, missing four of her first five shots and registering a total of nine. At this stage, Stanco was way in front with a perfect fifteen, with both Coelho de Barros and Galvez on eleven. But Coelho de Barros missed three of her next four and then her last three to register only fifteen in total, with Galvez coming second with twenty, safely behind Stanco who managed an impressive twenty-four. In the other ranking match, composed of Grassia, Hall, Molne Magrina and Rossi, Grassia was eliminated early with just nine of her first fifteen, while Molne Magrina was off in front with thirteen, just ahead of Hall and Rossi on twelve. However, the Spaniard faltered, hitting just four of the final ten shots to register a total of seventeen, with Rossi on twenty and Hall on nineteen qualifying. Into the medal match then, and the quality was evident from the start. Galvez was eliminated after fifteen due to only hitting ten: Hall lead on fourteen with the Italians on thirteen each. But Rossi missed three of her next five and could only recover to twenty, with Hall on 21 and Stanco on 22. Hall hit the next ten perfectly to end on 31 and put the pressure on Stanco... but the Italian held her nerve to do the same and pip the Brit into second with 32. This meant that the women's quotas went to Italy and Great Britain. So the first qualifiers for shooting have been decided: on the men's side, the Czech Republic and Sweden, and on the women's side, Italy and Great Britain. On 8 September, qualifying for the Men's and Women's Skeet will begin, the other events with Olympic quotas to be decided in Larnaca. The next chance for European (and indeed any) trap shooters will be at the 2022 World Championship (Shotgun) in Osijek, Croatia, which starts next month. Patrick Green Writer, Totallympics News
    3 points
  8. The North American men's football qualifiers are set with the CONCACAF Under 20 Championship now complete. The semifinals took place in Estadio Morazán in San Pedro Sula, with the winners of each knowing they would qualify to Paris 2024 as the two representatives of North America, Central America and the Caribbean. The Dominican Republic took on Guatemala in the first game with Guatemala racing into an early lead. First Arquimides Ordoñez headed home a cross before Sebastián Mañón poked a teasing ball into his own goal. But the Dominican Republic fought back with two goals in quick succession in the second half: first Guillermo de Peña took advantage of a loose ball before Edison Azcona's low long shot found its way in. No more goals would come in regulation time, and extra time was mostly uneventful, apart from a Dominican penalty being overturned by the video assistant referee (VAR). So the Olympic spot and a place in the final would be decided on penalties. First Thomas Jungbauer stepped up for the Dominican Republic and sent the goalie the wrong way. And they had a clear advantage when Mathius Gaitán hit the post. But when Ángel Montes De Oca skied it and Daniel Cardoza dispatched his spot-kick the scores were level again. Azcona and Johnathan Franco both looked as cool as a cucumber, so it was 2-2 with two penalties each left. De Peña put his home, but Ordoñez saw his shot saved to give Adhonys María the chance to send the Dominican Republic through to the final, and that was exactly what he did. The other semifinal was at the same stadium as part of a double-header, and the US took on Honduras. And the Stars and Stripes did not delay as Paxton Aaronson poked home a freekick to put them ahead just two minutes in. Alejandro Alvarado Jr. then doubled the lead when his shot squirmed past the goalkeeper, and a large crowd were even more disappointed when Quinn Sullivan put in an open goal. A massacre was avoided as there were no goals in the semifinal, but things did get worse for the hosts when Jefryn Macías earned a late red card for a horror tackle on Nikolas Tsakiris. The final took place at the Estadio Olímpico Metropolitano, although both teams knew they would be in the Olympic Games no matter what. It was the US who drew first blood, with Tyler Wolff heading home a cross. Aaronson, certainly the star of the tournament doubled the lead with a smart short-range finish, before Noah Allen's deflected effort pretty much wrapped up the game before half time. There was still time for more though: Jack Mc Glynn fired in at long range with a low effort, before the Dominicans failed to mark Aaronson from a free-kick as the Philadelphia Union player got his seventh goal of the tournament. The final goal would be scored by Tsakiris as the Dominican Republic failed to clear their lines, to wrap up a hugely impressive 6-0 victory and take home the trophy. In men's football, the US have only ever won two medals, with the bizarre tournament at St. Louis 1904 containing one Canadian team and two American teams: Christian Brothers College won silver and St. Rose Parish won silver. But in the modern era they have won nothing. Since men's football became an underage competition in Barcelona 1992, the best they have done is a fourth placed finish in Sydney 2000. But they have missed the last three tournaments: a last minute goal conceded to El Salvador in Nashville cost them in 2012, a loss to Colombia scuppered their chances in 2016, and in 2020 it was Honduras that beat them. For a country that is becoming more and more of a 'soccer' nation, this triple failure was unacceptable for a country that looks to fight to be the best in the continent. But it seems they benefited from the change in format with the Under-20 Championship doubling as a qualifier (rather than a separate Under-23 championship). Throughout they were dominant, with a mature performance against a partisan crowd in the semifinal, fully justifying their top-seeded position and they deserve their place in Paris. The Dominican Republic's story is remarkable. It is the first time a Dominican football team of either gender has qualified for the Olympics, and 2020 was the first time they had even qualified for the qualification event, coming last and losing every game in their group. They were ranked so low that they had to enter a qualifying round, where they were 2-0 down to Saint Lucia and heading out with two minutes to go, before two late goals got them the goal they needed. Beating an impressive El Salvador side who topped their group 5-4 was one thing, before they showed perseverance against Jamaica and resilience to come back from 2-0 down against Guatemala. The 6-0 loss in the final aside, they may have gotten some luck but they also deserve their place in the final. North American men's football qualification for the Olympics is thus decided: the champions, the US and the runners-up Honduras will go to Paris. They will also enter the 2023 FIFA U-20 World Cup in Indonesia, where they will be joined by losing semi-finalists Honduras and Guatemala. The other country in the Olympics is hosts France, with all other qualifying events listed currently as "to be determined". However, for football fans, the women's North American event, the CONCACAF W Championship, starts soon. Patrick Green Writer, Totallympics News
    3 points
  9. Japan’s Kanoa Igarashi and United States’ Kirra Pinkerton were crowned champions today at the World Surfing Games. The event was held at Huntington Beach, United States from September 16th to September 24th 2022. 2020 Olympic silver medalist Igarashi had a perfect competition where he finished first in all eight rounds on route to winning gold. In the final, he finished ahead of Indonesia’s Rio Waida and Australia’s Jackson Baker whom won silver and bronze. Pinkerton had a similar experience, never being relegated to the second chance repechage bracket as she finished either first or second in all of her heats. In the final, her score of 13.63 barely edged out France’s Pauline Ado’s score of 13.00. The bronze medal was won by Australia’s Sally Fitzgibbons. The event doubled as the first opportunity for nations to qualify to the 2024 Olympics. The highest ranked nation from the men’s and women’s team points ranking qualified a spot to the games. Up to three surfers contribute to their nation’s ranking based on the placing they achieved with the winner getting 1000 points, second receiving 860 points, third obtaining 730 points and so on. Buoyed by their individual championship title, the winner of the team points competition was Japan for the men and the United States for the women. The Olympic quota is awarded to the nation and it is up to the respective National Olympic Committee to choose which athlete will compete. As a reminder, despite the 2022 World Surfing Games occurring first, it is actually lower on the quota hierarchy which could have some implications. Should the nations which won a quota today win a third quota from the team points ranking at the 2024 World Surfing Games, the quota won here will be reallocated to the second-place nation, specifically the United States for the men and Australia for the women. The next opportunity for surfers to qualify to the Olympics will be at the 2023 World Surfing Games.
    2 points
  10. Bulgaria will get to defend its Olympic title after winning the Group All-Around title for the first time since 2014 at the World Championships. In terms of Olympic qualification, the top three nations in the group all-around final qualify a team of five athletes to the games. The 2022 Rhythmic Gymnastics World Championships are currently being held in Sofia, Bulgaria from September 14th to September 18th 2022. The host nation, performed consistently well in both apparatuses, scoring a 33.800 in the five hoops and a 32.800 in the three ribbons + two balls for an overall score of 66.600. The 3 ribbons + 2 balls performance was the difference maker as they finished two points clear over second place Israel and were the only two nations to finish with a score above 30. Israel finished with a total score of 64.650 while Spain grabbed the third and final quota thanks to a 63.200 performance. The Bulgarian team was made up of an entirely new group from the team which won gold in Tokyo. The team included Sofia Ivanova, Kamelia Petrova, Rachel Stoyanov, Radina Tomova, Zhenina Trashlieva and Margarita Vasileva. Pre-tournament favourites Italy had a relatively poor performance in the 3 ribbons + 2 balls and while they were the best team in the 5 hoops, it was not enough and they finished fourth. Italy and other nations will have other opportunities to qualify to the Olympics, with the next one being the 2023 World Championships.
    2 points
  11. Gymnastics will know its first Olympic qualifiers over the next few days as the 2022 FIG Rhythmic World Championships take place in Sofia, Bulgaria. The Armeets Arena in Sofia is perhaps best known as home to the Bulgarian volleyball team, as well as the ATP Sofia Open tennis tournament, but in the coming week some of the best rhythmic gymnasts in the world will compete. Up for grabs are three places each in the Individual and Group competitions (only women compete in this discipline). It should be noted that there are at most two places in the individual competition per NOC, and hosts France are already guaranteed of one individual and one group place, although they are unlikely to cause too many headaches here. Looking at the individual lists, it's a whole new look for the Israeli team, with Olympic champion Linoy Ashram retiring from the sport earlier this year, and Nicol Zelikman, who finished 7th in Tokyo also calling quits on elite competition. However, blue and white hopes will instead be put on Daria Atamanov, whose European gold earlier this year showed she was worthy of carrying Ashram's torch. Adi Asya Katz, who came 11th in Tel Aviv, is also on the Israeli team. In fact, none of the three medallists will be in Sofia, as Dina Averina (ROC) and Alina Harnasko (Belarus) both come from countries that are banned from competing. Other Tokyo finalists will be there, with home favourite Boryana Kaleyn, who came fifth in Tokyo, considered Atamanov's greatest threat for gold: she was runner-up at the Europeans in Tel Aviv. Considering that the ten finalists in Tokyo were all European, it is hard not to consider that a warm-up for this week's event, and other athletes including bronze medallist Stiliana Nikolova (Bulgaria), Sofia Raffaeli (Italy) and Darja Varfolomeev (Germany) will be hoping for a quota place. Sixty-two countries representing all five continents will be represented in Sofia, all bar Venezuela have at least one individual: in total, eighty-two athletes will enter. In the group competition, Bulgaria won gold in Tokyo and it's of course natural to focus on them first especially considering the venue, but an all-new group will take part this time, comprising of none of the Olympic champions. Bulgaria still came fourth in Tel Aviv, where Israel won gold. There will be a fair heap of pressure of course, especially with a home crowd watching, including the champions. Israel are another big contender, coming sixth in Tokyo. Silver medallists the ROC of course are absent, but Olympic bronze medallists and European runners-up Italy will hope to medal here too. Azerbaijan came tenth in Tokyo, but a bronze in Tel Aviv means they will have to be considered. Moving away from Europe, the Asian trio of Uzbekistan, Japan, and China will be hoping to cause a splash, although a medal may be beyond their reach somewhat. Twenty-nine groups compete in total, with Africa the only continent left out: Angola, Egypt, and South Africa instead focusing on individual competition. The individual qualification begins on September 14, with the final on September 17. The group event is on September 16. Patrick Green Writer, Totallympics News
    2 points
  12. Further information on the process for Sailing and Volleyball qualifying to the Olympic Games in Paris has been confirmed over the last few days. Sailing The main addition to Sailing's procedures is confirmation that the 2024 Last Chance Regatta is now confirmed to take place in Hyeres, France, on 18-27 April 2024. The event will qualify five boats each in the Windsurfing and Kite competitions (for each gender), four in the Mixed Dinghy event, and three in every other event. Furthermore, a few continental qualifiers have been released. The European qualifiers include the 2023 Formula Kite European Championships (Portsmouth, GBR, 16-24 Sep 2023), the 2023 European Championship (Vilamoura, POR, 10-15 Oct 2023) for 49er, FX, and Nacra 17 events, while the 2024 World Championships (Lanzarote, ESP, 26 Jan-3 Feb 2024) will serve as the qualifying for iQFOiL events, where as the 2024 ILCA Senior European Championship and Open European Trophy (Athens, GRE, 16-23 Feb 2024) and the 2024 World Championships (Palma, ESP, 24 Feb-3 Mar 2024) will be the qualifier for the 470 class. Furthermore, the 2023 Pan American Games (Santiago, CHI, 20 Oct-10 Nov 2023) will be the qualifier for both the Central and South American, and North American and Caribbean zones, for all events bar the MX Dinghy, which will have its own qualifier, details of which remain unconfirmed. No details have been released for the Africa, Asia, or Oceania zones. Finally, another qualification event, the 2024 ILCA 7 World Championships has been confirmed to take place in Adelaide, Australia, from 24-31 January 2024, while the 2024 ILCA 6 World Championships has been confirmed to take place in Mar del Plate, Argentina, on a date to be confirmed. Volleyball Volleyball has made a slight alteration to its qualification system. In the Qualification Tournaments, the system used to say that the top 24 out of the ranking of 12 September 2022 for men and 17 October 2022 would participate. However, this has now been updated so that 21 of the 24 teams would come from this set of countries, while the other three would be host federations, instead selected from the rankings of 20 September 2021. Athletics remains the only sport not have its qualification system confirmed. Patrick Green Writer, Totallympics News
    2 points
  13. The 2022 European Championships (Shotgun) in Larnaca have had their final Olympic spots decided with two spots each being earned in the Men's and Women's Skeet. NOCs came into this event knowing that if they qualified one man and one woman they would also guarantee a spot in the mixed team event. Starting with the men's side, 78 athletes entered, although nine of these were "Ranking Points Only" (RPO) entries, which meant they couldn't progress from qualification or earn a spot at the Games. The first round was a qualification round, with eight athletes progressing, and 125 targets to shoot. Leading the way was Eric Delaunay of France with 124 hits, with GB's Ben Llewellin in second with 123. Jesper Hansen of Denmark and Luigi Lodde of Italy were tied for third on 122 hits, sending it to a marathon shoot-off: Lodde finally winning it: twenty hits to nineteen. Also on 122 hits was Georgios Achilleos of Cyprus, but as a Ranking Points Only athlete he did not enter the shoot-off and finished fifth. The next seven athletes all got 121 hits, and apart from another Cypriot RPO, Andreas Chasikos, who finished twelfth, the top four of the remaining six in the shoot-off would qualify. In the first shoot-off, Jakub Tomecek of the Czech Republic qualified in sixth with twelve hits, while Mikola Milchev of Ukraine came seventh with ten, and Tammaro Cassandro of Italy came eighth with nine. But the Czech Republic's Tomas Nydrle, Georgia's Yaroslav Startsev and Dainis Upelniks of Latvia were all tied on just one hit. There would be another shoot-off for ninth and the final spot: but both Nydrle and Startsev managed two, while Upelniks could just get one. So Upelniks was eliminated in eleventh, and a third shoot-off was necessary for Nydrle and Startsev, which the Georgian finally took 4-3. Achilleos aside, the remaining eight of the top nine then progressed to the Ranking Round, in which they would be split into two matches of four. The lowest-placed athlete after twenty hits would be eliminated in both matches, with the remaining three continuing until thirty hits were completed: the top two would go through, while third would also be eliminated. The first match was composted of Cassandro, Delaunay, Lodde, and Tomecek. And after twenty hits it was Delaunay and Lodde that led the way with nineteen hits, while Cassandro and Tomecek were on eighteen: Tomecek survived due to finishing higher in the shoot-off. After that though, the Czech held his nerve while others faltered, hitting a perfect ten out of his last ten to finish on 28. Lodde also finished on 28, but Delaunay missed two of his last ten to be eliminated on 27. In the other Ranking Match; Hansen, Llewellin, Milchev and Startsev were the four to face off. After twenty shots, Hansen led with nineteen, with Llewellin and Startsev on eighteen, Milchev was eliminated with sixteen. All three remaining hit nine of their next ten, so Hansen went through on 28, but Llewellin and Startsev had to shoot-off for 2nd on 27. The Briton took it 4-3 and advanced to the medal match. So it would be Hansen, Llewellin, Lodde and Tomecek in the final: whoever was last after twenty shots would be eliminated in fourth, then of the remaining three whoever was last after thirty would be eliminated and take the bronze medal, finally, whoever was ahead after forty would win gold. Twenty shots in and Lodde and Tomecek had gone without a single miss, while Llewellin was on nineteen, Hansen was eliminated with seventeen. Lodde then hit his next ten to extend his perfect run to thirty, while Tomecek missed just one to bring his total to 29. Llewellin missed two and was eliminated with a bronze medal on 27. In the final ten shots, Tomecek missed just one while Lodde's resolve finally broke and he missed two, meaning they tied on 38 apiece. In a gruelling shoot-off, which seemed to go on forever, Tomecek finally came out the winner 20-19. So gold for the Czech Republic and silver for Italy, and those two countries get a quota place. Over to the women's side and there were 35 entrants, none of which were "RPO"s. Germany's Nadine Messerschmidt topped qualifying with 119 hits, ahead of Danka Bartekova of Slovakia in second with 117. Five athletes were tied for 116, with Diana Bacosi of Italy in third, Konstantia Nikolaou of Cyprus in fourth, Barbora Sumova of the Czech Republic in fifth, Amber Hill of Great Britain in sixth and Lucie Anastassiou of France in seventh after the shoot-offs. More dramatic was the six-way tie for eighth on 114, with Marjut Heinonen of Finland winning the shoot-off to get the last spot, ahead of Martina Bartolomei and Chiara Cainero, both of Italy, Nele Wissmer of Germany, Victoria Larsson of Sweden and Jessica Louise Burgess of Great Britain. The first Ranking Match was made up of Anastassiou, Bacosi, Messerschmidt, and Sumova, and after twenty hits Messerschmidt led with eighteen ahead of Bacosi on seventeen, with Sumova and Anastassiou on fifteen: the Czech survived based on the qualification performance. Bacosi hit all of her next ten to qualify first with 27, and Messerschmidt joined her with 25 despite missing three of her final ten: Sumova missed one to finish on 24. In the other ranking match, which was composed of Bartekova, Heinonen, Hill, and Nikolau, Hill put on a special display, hitting all twenty of her first targets to lead with Bartekova also impressive on nineteen. Nikolau survived on seventeen while Heinonen on sixteen was eliminated. Nikolau had no answer though as both Hill and Bartekova hit their final ten to finish with a perfect thirty and a 29 respectively, while the Cypriot could only hit seven and was eliminated on 24. So off to the final then, which could be composed of Bacosi, Bartekova, Hill, and Messerschmidt and it was ultra-competitive from the start: after twenty shots, Messerschmidt had hit a perfect twenty while Hill, Bartekova, and Bacosi were all on nineteen: the Italian eliminated due to her inferior ranking round score. The next ten were perfect from Hill while Bartekova and Messerschmidt could only manage eight: this meant that Hill now led on 29, Messerschmidt was on 28, and Bartekova was eliminated on 27. In the final round, Hill had hit nine out of ten to finish on 38 while Messerschmidt hit her first nine to bring herself up to 37. She just needed to hit the final target to force a shoot-off, but missed to hand Hill the gold and Great Britain the first quota place. Messerschmidt still earned silver and a quota place of her own to Germany. That is the last of the Olympic qualification events from Larnaca then, on a day where the Czech Republic and Italy won quotas in the men's skeet, and Great Britain and Germany did so in the women's. The 25/50m European Championships are underway in Poland with Olympic qualification events soon to start. The next chance athletes will get in these events is the 2022 World Championships (Shotgun) in Osijek, Croatia.
    2 points
  14. Eight more spots at Paris 2024 have been confirmed in the sport of Shooting, as the 2022 European Championships (25m/50m) took place in Wrocław, Poland. The top-two placing athletes in each event, with the stipulation that they can't be from the same NOC, earned a spot for their country in Paris. The four events were the Men's 50m Rifle 3 Positions, the Men's Rapid Fire Pistol, the Women's 50m Rifle 3 Positions, and the Women's 25m Pistol. Starting on the men's side, with the 50m Rifle 3 Positions, and to whittle down a large start list an elimination relay was held: there it was Norway's Simon Claussen (594) and Jon-Hermann Hegg (592) that impressed with a 1-2. With the final 36 athletes known, including three ranking points only (RPO) shooters, qualification was next, and the top eight would qualify with two hundred shots in each of the three positions, for a total of six hundred. In the end it was Lithuania's Karolis Girulis with a 593-38x, just ahead of Petr Nymbursky of the Czech Republic on 593-36x. Croatia's Miran Maricic (591) and Nymbursky's compatriot Jiri Privratsky (590-39x) were next, just ahead of Bulgarian Anton Rizov (590-38x), Slovakian Patrik Jany (590-36x). Hegg (590-34x) and Claussen (589-39x) were the last qualifiers, with five other athletes on 589 just missing out: Serhiy Kulish of Ukraine (35x), Frantisek Smetana of the Czech Republic (33x; he was an "RPO" athlete anyway), Petar Gorsa of Croatia (30x), Christoph Duerr of Switzerland (29x), and Ole Martin Halvorsen of Norway (28x). In the ranking round, with decimal scoring, the quota spots would be decided, as the top two would go to a gold medal match. Two series would be fired in each position, then the bottom two would be eliminated; a third series would be fired in the standing position, and two more would be eliminated, and then one final standing series to determine the final two of the four. Jany was down after the kneeling phase but recovered in the prone and standing section, pulling him away from Girulis (303.8) and Rizov (302.9). In the next stage, Claussen (353.7) had a poor final series to join Maricic (353.4) in being eliminated. With one more series to go, an impressive 50.9 from Hegg made him qualify in first with 408.0, and though Nymbursky faltered somewhat he still had enough to qualify second in 407.7. A good final series wasn't enough for Privratsky (407.0) to close the gap, missing out alongside Jany (404.5). Gold medal matches are held with each athlete shooting, earning two points for a higher score, with the first to sixteen winning; a tie earns one point each, but with this somewhat rare, it is practically a best-of-15 shoot-off. With the score at 12-12, Hegg shot a 10.5 while Nymbursky could only manage a 9.6, putting the Norwegian in pole position. However, in the next shot, Nymbursky hit a 10.6 while Hegg earned a 9.7, leading to one final shoot-off. The pressure got to Hegg, who hit an 8.9, and Nymbursky's 10.8 earned a gold medal for the Czech Republic. It's another quota in shooting for them, while Hegg earns Norway's first in Paris. Moving over to the Rapid Fire Pistol, and 39 athletes, four of whom were RPOs. With the top eight going through, and with a total of 600 shots, Ukraine's Pavlo Korostylov was top in qualifying with 587 hits. Germany's Oliver Geis was next with 586, while France's Clement Bessaguet (20x) and Great Britain's Sam William Gowin (18x) on 585. Florian Peter of Germany (22x), Martin Strnad of the Czech Republic (16x), and Maksym Horodynets of Ukraine (14x) were next on 584, with the final spot going to Italy's Massimo Spinella on 581. Next would be the ranking matches, where there would be four series of five shots each (a total of twenty), and the top two would advance. The first ranking match was comprised of Bessaguet, Horodynets, Korostylov and Peter, and after two series there was a clear pattern, with everyone on seven hits bar Peter on five. Korostylov hit all five in the next series, while Bessaguet and Peter managed four, Horodynets, fatally, only hit three. In the final series, everyone would only hit three, meaning that Korostylov (fifteen) and Bessaguet (fourteen) advanced, while Horodynets (thirteen) and Peter (twelve) were eliminated. Geis, Gowin, Spinella, and Strnad took part in the second match, where consistency was key, Geis (eighteen) and Strnad (fourteen) advancing relatively easily, with Gowin (eleven) and Spinella (ten) in the cold. In the final, the fourth-placed shooter would be eliminated after four series, with a further two to eliminate third-placed, and another two to decide a winner. After three series, Bessaguet and Geis were ahead on eleven, with Korostylov on ten and Strnad on nine. Any chance the Czech had of recovering to medal was lost when he missed four in the fourth series and was eliminated on ten: Geis was in the danger zone on twelve after also missing four, but he hit a perfect ten in his next two series to eliminate Korostylov on 21. After seven series, it was 25-25, with one series left to go between France and Germany for gold, and it was Bessaguet who took all five hits to win 30-29 and become European champion. The quota spots then, go to France and Germany. The fact that a place has gone to hosts France mean their automatic host spot no longer applies; instead, a second spot will be earned based on the qualification ranking. Moving to the women's side, and again starting with the 50m Rifle 3 Positions, it was once more a Norwegian leading the elimination relay, with Jenny Stene setting a Qualification European Record 595 hits. In qualification, with 36 athletes including eight "RPO"s, Stene improved her own record to 596, with Sarina Hitz of Switzerland coming second with 593. Rikke Maeng Ibsen of Denmark was next with a 592, and Jeanette Hegg Deustad of Norway managed 591. The Czech Republic's Veronika Blazickova (33x) and Ukraine's Daria Tykhova (31x) both managed 590, with Germany's Jolyn Beer (589-36x) and Slovenia's Ziva Dvorsak (589-32x) just edging out Austria's Nadine Ungerank (589-26x) for the final spot. The ranking match is unforgiving, and those that are not keeping pace get eliminated, as Dvorsak (304.4) and Beer (302.8) soon found out. Hitz was clearly out and finished 6th on 356.5, but who would go into the final four? It was close between Duestad and Stene, but the Norwegian let herself down with a 49.5 to finish and she was eliminated on 358.0. Duestad was too far adrift to make the top two, finishing fourth on 409.9, and Ibsen was too far in front and finished well ahead on 413.9 even with an underwhelming final series, but after Tykhova faltered in the final series Blazickova could overturn the gap to her. She did with an impressive 50.9, pipping Tykhova 411.7-410.4. In the medal match, Ibsen raced into a lead and wasn't caught, it finished an uneventful 16-6 to the Dane. The quota spots went to Denmark and the Czech Republic. Finally, the women's 25m pistol event, which follows a similar format to the men's rapid fire pistol. 51 athletes, including four RPOs, entered qualifying, and it was Germany's Doreen Vennekamp who led the way on 592. Anna Korakaki of Greece was next on 588, while Antoaneta Kostadinova's 587-20x just pipped Camille Jedrzejewski of France's 587-19x onto 4th. Maria Varricchio of Italy (19x) and Renata Sike of Hungary (18x) both managed 583, while Joana Castelao of Portugal was safely through on 582. Poland's Klaudia Bres was through on 581-18x, pipping Ukraine's Olena Kostevych on 581-17x and Latvian Agate Rasmane on 581-16x. The first ranking match was made up of Castelao, Kostadinova, Varricchio, and Vennekamp. In the end, Vennekamp advanced simply, on seventeen, while Castelao and Varricchio tied for second with thirteen, and Kostadinova was eliminated on eleven. In the shoot-off, the Italian took it 4-2, joining Vennekamp in the final. The other ranking match had Bres, Jedrezjewski, Korakaki, and Sike. After a challenging first series it was close all the way through, but Jedrezejewski and Korakaki never recovered from hitting just one in that initial series. In the end, Bres (thirteen) and Sike (twelve) went through, with Korakaki (eleven) and Jedrezejewski (ten) eliminated. In the final, what seemed inevitable became reality. Sike hit just three from the first two series, but hit a perfect ten in her next two to get her nose in front of Varricchio, who was eliminated on twelve. While Bres and Sike were both on thirteen at this stage, the dominant Vennekamp had already worked her way into a commanding lead with eighteen. It was still a close-run thing for silver, and it went to a single shot, with Sike eliminated on seventeen and Bres surviving on eighteen. It didn't last long: after one more series, Vennekamp lead 29-21, and as victory was mathematically secured, a Golden Hit was declared and the German was European champion; Germany and Poland securing the quota spots. The short version of this article reads that on the men's side, the 50m Rifle 3 Positions spots went to the Czech Republic and Norway, while the Rapid Fire Pistol berths went to France and Germany, while on the women's side, the 50m Rifle 3 Positions places headed to Denmark and the Czechs, while the Germans and Poland earned a place in the 25m pistol event. The next chance shooters in this category will get is the 2022 World Championship (Rifle and Pistol) in Cairo, Egypt. Patrick Green Writer, Totallympics News
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  15. The South American qualifier for Women's Football, the 2022 Copa América Femenina, has seen the conclusion of the group stage. The ten countries in the South American Football Confederation (CONMEBOL) were split into two groups for a competition based in Colombia in which the winner will have the right to call themselves the South American champion, in addition to the two Olympic quota spots, three Pan American Games spots (the teams coming in third, fourth, and fifth make that competition) and three spots in the FIFA Women's World Cup (as well as two play-off spots). The top two teams in each group would go to semi-finals, with third in each group going to a fifth-placed play-off. Chile, having already qualified for the Pan American Games as host, were not considered in qualifying for that competition. In Group A, with most games held at the Estadio Olimpico Pascual Guerrero in Cali, on the opening day a double-header kicked off with Bolivia facing Ecuador. A corner from Ecuador was not fully dealt with and Nayely Bolaños was there to score the tournament's opener. Danna Pesántez made it two for La Tricolor after having an open goal due to a smart cutback. Marthina Aguierre was next to benefit from a cutback and made it three before half time. Things got worse for Bolivia when Kimberly López was sent off for denial of a clear goalscoring opportunity, but La Verde did have at least one positive when Érika Salvatierra headed home a rebound after a free-kick was pushed on to the woodwork. But that was only a brief respite for the Bolivians, as Giannina Lattanzio put in an open goal before a corner was converted acrobatically by Joselyn Espinales and a ball over the top gave Bolaños her second goal in injury time to wrap up a 6-1 win. Colombia kicked off their campaign against Paraguay, and the hosts found the lead through a rebound from Daniela Montoya. But Paraguay fought back, with an amazing free kick from at least thirty metres out by Jessica Martínez finding the net. Colombia regained their lead before the break after Mayra Ramírez headed home a cross, before Montoya got her third after taking advantage of a goalkeeping fumble. Another header from a cross, this time Manuela Vanegas confirmed the victory for Las Chicas Superpoderosas but Paraguay did get a consolatory goal from another amazing free kick, this time from Fany Gauto, to complete a 4-2 loss. The next matchday was another double-header, with Paraguay looking to get back to winning ways against Chile. And they got off to a perfect start, with Rebeca Fernández reacting to a looping ball over the top quickest, before Martínez took advantage of suspect goalkeeping to double Paraguay's lead. But Chile fought back when Daniela Pardo headed home a free kick crossed into the box before half-time. In the second half Paraguay regained their two-goal cushion through a Fabiola Sandoval strike from outside the box, and though Yenny Acuña fired home in injury time, there was not enough time for an equaliser and the game finished a 3-2 win for Paraguay. The second game of the day saw Bolivia take on Colombia. The hosts were hitting their stride as Leicy Santos fired a long shot in and although they missed a penalty, Colombia had no problems wrapping up the game, as Ericka Morales poked it past her own goalie and Daniela Arias headed in a corner to get a 3-0 win. Day three and another double header in Cali, starting with Paraguay's match against Bolivia. Paraguay extended their winning run thanks to a 2-0 victory, with a tap-in by Ramona Martínez and a similar goal by Rebeca Fernández earning the three points. In the second game, Chile took on Ecuador, and Chile took the lead just before half time when Camila Sáez got the last touch from a corner. In the second half, the lead was doubled when Acuña put home a cross, and although Ecuador quickly got one back thanks to a smart finish by Aguirre, they couldn't find an equaliser and Chile took a 2-1 win. The fourth and final double-header started with Chile facing Bolivia, and La Roja Femenina were in no mood to hang about against the group's whipping girls. Three early goals: a smart strike from Francisca Lara, an own goal from a corner from Salvatierra and a well hit effort from Paloma López. Lara nodded in her second in injury time, and in the second half there was still one more goal to be scored as Mary Valencia headed home number five. In the other game, Ecuador took on Colombia. The hosts took the lead when Ramírez pounced on a through ball but they were soon pegged back by Nicole Charcopa after losing possession in their own final third. But it would be Colombia who would win the game through Linda Caicedo's goal as she took advantage on a lovely back-heeled assist on the stroke of half time and the second period would be goalless. On the final day, Ecuador took on Paraguay in Cali and Colombia faced Chile at the Estadio Centenario in Armenia. When play started, Colombia led the group on nine points, both Paraguay and Chile had six (with Paraguay ahead on head-to-head) and Ecuador had three, with Bolivia out on zero points. The hosts were in no mood to be charitable, with María Catalina Usme putting them ahead early on from about fifteen metres out, before Arias dinked in number two after a goalkeeping fumble. Chile's defenders were unable to cope and that was made clear by the third goal, a through-ball splitting the back line to find Manuela Vanegas who provided the finish. There was still time for one more goal before the break with Liana Salazar heading home a freekick to confirm top spot and a 4-0 win. In the other game, Jessica Martínez gave Paraguay the lead from a header before Kerlly Real smashed home an equaliser after a goalmouth scramble. With the game at 1-1, Lice Chamorro's injury time header gave Paraguay a win and sent them through to the semifinals. In the end, Colombia won Group A and will play the second-placed team in Group B in the semifinals, while Paraguay came second and will face the winners of Group B. Chile, in third, will play the third-placed team in group B in the fifth-placed play-off, while Ecuador and Bolivia headed out. Group B was mostly played in Armenia, with a double-header on the first day kicking off with Uruguay taking on Venezuela. It was Venezuela that took a 1-0 win thanks to Deyna Castellanos' free kick that went in off the bar. In the later game, Brazil took on Argentina and found life relatively easy. First, Adriana had a tap-in, before Ruth Bravo lazily brought down Tainara in the box and Bia Zaneratto put home the penalty. In the second half, Adriana rounded the goalie to get her second before Debhina did the same to wrap up a 4-0 win for Brazil. On the second day, Uruguay took on Brazil in the first game and it was Brazil that got the lead through a familiar source, Adriana tapping in at the far post after a low cross eluded everyone. The Seleção added to their advantage when Debinha was slipped through in injury time before getting another soon into the second half as Adriana again converted at the far post for a 3-0 win. In the other game, Argentina played Peru, and La Albiceleste soon put the Brazil defeat behind them as Yamila Rodríguez opened the scoring from a tap-in, while in the second half the floodgates opened. A cross converted by Flor Bonsegundo, a daisycutter from Eliana Stabile and a goal in-off the post from Érica Lonigro gave Argentina a 4-0 win. On day three the first game was between Argentina and Uruguay, and Argentina had found their rhythm. It took them until the stroke of half time to get ahead when Estefanía Banini trapped a long ball over the top and found the net. In the second half it was the Rodríguez show, as she scored the second from close range before latching onto a through ball to score number three and then finishing her hat-trick from another through-ball: Uruguay were clearly ill-equipped to deal with this tactic. Another close-range effort, this time from Stabile in injury time, wrapped up a 5-0 win for Argentina. In the late game it was Peru against Venezuela and it was Castellanos that got the opening goal again for La Vinotinto, pouncing on a sloppy back pass. Oriana Altuve's rebound into an empty net wrapped up a 2-0 win for the Venezuelans. Day four saw the two top sides in the group so far, Venezuela and Brazil, face off. Zaneratto gave Brazil an early lead and they never looked back, with goals in the second half coming from a smart Ary Borges strike, a Debinha header, and a powerful finish also by Debinha. In the second game, Peru took on Uruguay. In a game that saw no goals in the first half, Uruguay found their feet in the second period: firstly, Pamela González headed home a corner before Belen Aquino tucked home a crossed free-kick. A header from Esperanza Pizarro was next, and then came a driven effort from Ximena Velasco. There was still time for two more goals: González finding her second of the night with a low finish and Pizarro doing the same from a corner to earn a 6-0 win. On the final day, Brazil took on Peru in Cali while Venezuela faced Argentina in Armenia. Brazil were on nine points, Venezuela and Argentina on six (with Argentina ahead on goal difference), Uruguay on three and Peru also out on zero. Brazil took mere seconds to find the lead with Duda putting the finishing touch on an elegant move. Maria Sampaio doubled the lead in a crowded box, before Geyse smashed home number three. Before the break there was still time for another goal when Gretta Martínez brought down Duda Santos in the box, and the Palmeiras midfielder got up and placed the penalty smartly for a 4-0 half-time lead. In the second half, Fernanda head home a corner before the second spot-kick of the game as Liliana Vanegas bought down Sampaio in the box and substitute Adriana scored to earn her fifth goal of the tournament and a 6-0 win that confirmed Brazil would get top spot. But who would join them? This set up a crunch encounter: if Venezuela beat Argentina they would reach the semifinals, if not it would be Argentina. And perhaps nerves showed in a tetchy game decided by one goal, a cutback that Bonsegundo converted. This means that Brazil got top spot and will face Paraguay in the second semifinal, not before Colombia take on runners-up Argentina. In the fifth-placed play-off Chile take on Venezuela, while Uruguay came fourth in the group and Peru fifth. The third- and fifth-placed play-offs will take place in Armenia, while the semifinals and final will be in Estadio Alfonso López in Bucaramanga. The two finalists will make the Olympics and the World Cup, with the third-placed team also making the World Cup. The fourth-placed team and fifth-placed team will make the World Cup play-offs. The losing semi-finalists will join Chile and Peru in the Pan American Games. Patrick Green Writer, Totallympics News
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  16. The pathway to Paris 2024 qualification is nearly known completely with only Athletics and the BMX Freestyle discipline of Cycling yet to release its procedures. But although the documents have been released, a lot of the particulars remain ambiguous, such as the precise event quotas will be earned. This is true especially for continental qualifications, often listed as TBC. Breaking Breaking, a new sport at Paris 2024 was one such sport. There are 16 places per gender (including one host and two universality spots). The thirteen qualification spots go to the winner of the 2023 World Championship, the winner of five previously unknown continental champions, and seven from an "Olympic Qualifier Series" (OQS), details of which remain scarce. However, the events for Asia, Europe and the Americas have now been announced. The winners of the Breaking events at the 2022 Asian Games (Hangzhou, CHN, 23 Sep-8 Oct 2023), 2023 European Games (Krakow, POL, 21 Jun-2 Jul 2023) and the 2023 Pan American Games (Santiago, CHI, 20 Oct-5 Nov 2023) will qualify a spot. The new dates of the 2022 Asian Games have been announced following its postponement, allowing the World DanceSport Federation (WDSF) to update the system. Breaking is not present at the 2023 African Games nor the 2023 Pacific Games, and Africa and Oceania's qualifier remains "to be determined". This means that those continents may have to have a separate qualifier not attached to a major Games. Breaking was recently added to the 2023 Pan American Games, the sport's debut at the PanAms. The WDSF seemed delighted and Breaking seems to be solidifying itself as an established sport at major Games, increasing the chances it will survive beyond Paris 2024. The European Games will open the qualification procedure for Breaking. Patrick Green Writer, Totallympics News
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  17. Aquatics, a sport containing five disciplines, has revealed the qualification procedure for the Paris 2024 Olympic Games. The reveal of the systems for Artistic Swimming, Diving, Marathon Swimming, Swimming, and Water Polo mean that Athletics is the only sport yet to release any systems, although the BMX Freestyle discipline of Cycling is also yet to reveal its qualification procedure. Artistic Swimming Artistic Swimming is a women's only discipline, with a reduction from 104 to 96 women competing, down from Tokyo 2020,. There are still two events: a teams' event and a duets' event. A duet consists of two athletes, while a team consists of eight. Just like 2020, there will be ten teams, at most one per NOC. The host country will automatically gain a spot, while the winners of Continental Championships (dates and times TBC) gain a spot for each continent apart from Europe (as France automatically take their continental spot). The only continental championship to be revealed is the 2023 Pan American Games (Santiago, CHI, 20 Oct-5 Nov 2023). The other five places will be earned at the 21st FINA World Championships (Doha, QAT, 2-18 Feb 2024). This means that there is no longer a separate qualification event, perhaps due to the shorter cycle between Games. For the duets, there will now be 18 pairings, down from 22. The ten teams will automatically qualify a duet, and the two athletes in the duet must also be part of the team. Again, the winners of Continental Championships including the 2023 Pan American Games will earn a spot. Technically, the European spot should go to France, but as they will have already qualified from the Team competition there will also be a European event. The final three places will be earned at the 21st FINA World Championships. Again, this means the end of the qualification event. In the 2020 cycle, the Worlds were not a designated qualifying event for duets (although it was used for some continental quotas). Diving Diving has Individual and Synchronised 3m Springboard and 10m Platform events for both gender and 68 athletes per gender, this represents no change from 2020. In individual events, there are at most two places per NOC, but each individual athlete can only earn one place. The top twelve athletes at the 2023 FINA World Championships (Fukuoka, JPN, 14-30 Jul 2023) will qualify a place. The winners of Continental Championships (dates and locations TBC) including the 2023 Pan American Games will also qualify a spot. In this event, only the winners will qualify a place; if the winner has already qualified the place will be reallocated to the next qualification system. This is the 21st FINA World Championships, which will qualify twelve places plus any additional places. Extra places may also be added at this event in the case that the total quota of 136 places is for some reason not met. For the team events, there will be eight teams per event (one per NOC). The top three teams at the 2023 FINA World Championships, the top four at the 21st FINA World Championships, and the host country will be the eight teams. With two world championships during the cycle, the FINA World Cup has been replaced, but otherwise the system is mostly similar form 2024. Marathon Swimming In Marathon Swimming, there are 10km events for both genders, but there will now be 22 athletes per gender (at most two per NOC), down from 25. The qualification system is the same for both genders, just like Diving. Three athletes per gender will qualify a spot at the 2023 FINA World Championships, while the top thirteen athletes per gender from the 21st FINA World Championships will do the same. Each individual athlete can only earn one place at the Games. Then, the highest athlete left from each continent at those championships will also gain a place. Finally, there is a host country quota. Again, there is no longer a specific qualifier, instead the two world championships both earn places. Swimming Swimming has a total of thirty-five events. For both men and women, there are seventeen events: for Freestyle; 50m, 100m, 200m, 400m, 800m, and 1500m; for all of Backstroke, Breaststroke and Butterfly; 100m and 200m; a 200m and 400m event for Individual Medley, both 4x100m and 4x200m Freestyle Relays and a 4x100m Medley Relay. The thirty-fifth event is a mixed 4x100m Relay. There are 426 athletes per gender, down from 439 in Tokyo. In each indvidual event, there are at most two athletes per NOC, and at most one relay team per NOC. In individual events, hitting the Olympic Qualification Time (OQT) in FINA-approved events (1 Mar 2023-23 Jun 2024) will earn you a pathway in automatically. But there is a complicated medley of alternative ways to qualify. One can qualify by universality invitation (if an NOC qualifies no athlete, they can enter one man or one women as long as they participated in either the Fukuoka or Doha World Championships), or being part of a relay team. If you meet the easier Olympic Consideration Time (OCT). One athlete per event will be invited based on the OCT until there are less than 28 places (or one per event) left. For the remaining 27 (or less) places, who gets the nod will be based on World Ranking. In the Relay, each event will have sixteen teams. Three teams will qualify from the 2023 FINA World Championships and thirteen will qualify from the 21st FINA World Championships. This will allow two additional athletes per relay entered per NOC, at most twelve. This system is a slight modification from the 2020 system, basing the times on WCs only. Water Polo Water Polo maintains its 12-team men's tournament and 10-team women's tournament from 2020. A team consists of eleven members, and there is at most one team per NOC per event. Two teams will qualify from the 2023 FINA World Championships. The hosts will qualify, with five places (one per event) being earned at Continental Championships (dates and locations TBC) including the 2023 Pan American Games. The final four men's spots and the final two women's spots will be earned at the 21st FINA World Championships. The FINA Word League is gone as a qualifier, and like other events the dedicated qualifer is replaced by the extra World Championships. The Paris 2024 qualification system is underway, with host quotas decided and ranking periods underway, with some dedicated qualifiers taking place in Football and Triathlon. Patrick Green Writer, Totallympics News
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  18. In a move that could have major ramifications for Olympic qualification, the 2022 Asian Games have been delayed by a year. In May this year it was announced that the Games, to be held in Hangzhou, China, from 10-25 September were to be postponed indefinitely due to the COVID-19 pandemic. China is pursuing a "Zero-COVID" policy even now and the Games were thought to be too big a risk. This was a move that put a few sports' Olympic qualifiers into doubt. The Asian Games are the qualifying event for hockey in Asia and Asian Hockey Federation (AHF) President Dato Tayyab Ikram said that if the Games could not be held before September 2023 then the AHF would have to put on a separate qualification event as a "plan B". But new dates for the Games have now been announced with the Games taking place from 23 September to 8 October 2023. The Games consist of all Summer Olympic sports from 2020 and 2024 as well as Cricket, Dragon Boat, Kabbadi, Martial Arts (Ju-jitsu, Karate, and Kurash), "Mind Sports" (Bridge, Chess, Esports, Go, and Xiangqi), Roller skating, Sepak taraw, Squash, and Wushu. Archery and Tennis will also see qualification spots earned at the Games. Patrick Green Writer, Totallympics News
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  19. The group stage of the 2022 CONCACAF W Championship is over, and with it the Olympic dream of four countries. Group A kicked off with a double-header at Estadio Universitario in San Nicolás de los Garza. Firstly, the US took on Haiti, and it was the Americans that took the lead with a deft touch from Alex Morgan to convert a touch. And the two-time Olympic medallist headed home another cross not long after to double the lead. Haiti had a chance to come back but missed a penalty just before half-time, and in the second half time ticked away with the US extending their lead late on as a cross wasn't cleared fully by Haiti and Margaret Purce converted to make it 3-0, which was how it finished. In the other game, hosts Mexico took on Jamaica. It was the visitors who took the lead through a Khadija Shaw header and never let it go, the score finishing 1-0 despite Jamaica missing a penalty. On the second day, there was another double-header, this time in Estadio BBVA in Guadalupe. Jamaica took on the US but there would be no repeat of the Reggae Girlz' heroics as they were taught a lesson by the reigning world champions. An absolutely fantastic goal from Sophia Smith early on put the Stars and Stripes ahead and the Portland Thorns forward soon added second to double the lead. In the second half, Rose Lavelle forced home a cross that eluded everyone else before Purce was bundled down by Paige Bailey-Gayle in the box and Kristie Mewis converted the spotkick. There was still a bit more time left and Trinity Rodman put in a cross to round up a resounding 5-0 win. That was followed by a clash between Haiti and Mexico. And La Tri's awful tournament went from bad to worse when Stephany Mayor brought down Batcheba Louis in the box and Roselord Boreglla put Haiti one up. And Haiti pushed, having a goal disallowed before Nérilia Monsédir was through on goal in a second half and was bundled down while through on goal by keeper Emily Alvarado before picking herself up and dispatching the penalty. Melchie Durmonay was brought down by last player Greta Espinoza who was shown red after a video assistant referee (VAR) check completing a desperate few days for Mexico, whose humiliation wasn't quite over: Sherly Jeudy converted the free-kick to complete a 3-0 win. On the final day, the two games were concurrent, with the US taking on Mexico in San Nicolás de los Garza and Jamaica facing Haiti in Guadelupe. In the derby that defines CONCACAF football on the men's side but is incredibly one-sided on the women's side, the previously hapless Mexico showed some pride against the world champions, taking the game late before making their task harder as Jacqueline Ovalle got shown a straight red for an awful challenge on Lavelle. Even then, La Tri took the US to the very end with an 89th minute rebound from Kristie Mewis earning them the win. This meant that the US would go through as group winners, while Mexico finished bottom and their Olympic and World Cup dream is over for another cycle: as they last qualified for Canada 2015 that will mean more than a decade without playing in either of those competitions, while it will be at least a 24 year gap in between Olympic qualifications, last reaching the Games in Athens 2004. This meant that Jamaica vs Haiti was a straight shootout for the second spot in the group, but the game was one-sided. Trudi Carter put Jamaica ahead in the first half before a long shot from Shaw found its way in. Things got worse for Les Grenadières when Claire Constant handled the ball in the box and Shaw converted the penalty, before a comprehensive performance was wrapped up when Drew Spence headed home number four. To be fair, 4-0 was quite a deceptive scoreline in a end-to-end game but it featured suspect goalkeeping and defending for Haiti. Jamaica will play the Group B winners in the semifinal, while Haiti miss out on the Olympics but will go to the World Cup play-offs in New Zealand. In Group B a double-header in Guadelupe got us underway with Costa Rica facing Panama in the first game. Costa Rica took an early lead as Raquel Rodríguez headed home a corner and things only got better for Las Ticas as a fine effort from María Paula Salas doubled their lead before VAR picked up Katherine Castillo's foul on Rodríguez in the box and Katherine Alvarado stepped up to convert the penalty for a 3-0 win. Later on, Canada took on Trinidad and Tobago and it was Catherine Sinclair that headed home a cross to open the scoring for the Olympic champions. They would miss a penalty but then extend this lead with a second half blitz: Julia Grosso with a smart finish to double the lead before the same player forced home a near-post effort. Then a cutback found Jessie Fleming who had an easy finish for four, before a lovely through ball found Janine Beckie who made it five. There was time for one more when Jordyn Huitema was found in space and scored in injury time to make it end 6-0. The second double-header was in San Nicolás de los Garza and Trinidad and Tobago faced Costa Rica. The Soca Princesses were already having a hard time and the last thing they needed was bad luck, but went behind when Cristin Granados' long range effort from a corner deflected in. The game seemed beyond all doubt early on when Kedie Johnson earned a second yellow card for taking out María Paula Coto trying to recover a heavy touch. And things did indeed get worse for the Caribbean side when Lauryn Hutchinson managed to put a corner into her own net. Just before half time, another deflection gave Granados her second goal and in the second half an early thunderbolt from Alvarado added some gloss to the scoreline, wrapping up a 4-0 win. In the later game, Panama faced Canada and the latter had to labour to victory, with Grosso finding the ball in the box and showing patience to score the game's only goal. The final day saw Panama and Trinidad and Tobago, who were both already out, battle for the World Cup play-off spot in San Nicolás de los Garza. Marta Cox scored the only goal of the game to give Panama the win. It seemed that Trinidad and Tobago were never really at the races in this tournament, while Panama also struggled but at least join Haiti in New Zealand. In the other game, held at the same time in Guadalupe, Canada and Costa Rica faced off for top spot. An early goal from Fleming on the break before a nice effort from Sophie Schmidt went in off the post to give Canada the 2-0 win. This means that in the semi-finals, the US will face Costa Rica before Jamaica take on Canada at a double header in San Nicolás de los Garza. All four teams have now qualified for the FIFA 2023 Women's World Cup. The winner of the competition will qualify directly for the Olympics (and also for the 2024 CONCACAF W Gold Cup), while the runners-up and third-placed team will face off in an "Olympic play-in" in 2023. The fourth-placed team will see their Olympic dreams die, alongside Haiti, Mexico, Panama, and Trinidad and Tobago, who are eliminated from competition. Patrick Green Writer, Totallympics News
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  20. With the US and the Dominican Republic qualifying for the men's football event at the Paris 2024 Olympics, it is now the turn of North America's women's footballers to do the same. While the men's football is an underage event and had the stars of tomorrow, established names at the very top of world football are entering the 2022 CONCACAF W Championship. Eight teams enter the event. The top two teams; the US and Canada automatically qualified, while the other CONCACAF nations that entered (nine nations declined to do so) were in qualifying: with six groups of five teams, only the winner would progress. Mexico came through a group containing Puerto Rico, Suriname, Antigua and Barbuda, and Anguilla; Costa Rica overcame Saint Kitts and Nevis, Guatemala, Curaçao, and the US Virgin Islands; Jamaica got past the Dominican Republic, Bermuda, the Cayman Islands, and Grenada; Panama won a group also containing El Salvador, Belize, Barbados, and Aruba; Haiti got past Cuba, Honduras, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, and the British Virgin Islands; and Trinidad and Tobago won a group featuring Guyana, Nicaragua, Dominica, and the Turks and Caicos Islands. The qualifying process was littered with huge scorelines, but the final eight are now set. The event will take place in Mexico, with Guadalupe's Estadio BBVA, home of five-time North American men's champions CF Monterrey, as well as San Nicolás de los Garza's Estadio Universitario, home of seven-time men's Mexican champions Tigres UNAL providing impressive venues: both nearby in the Monterrey metropolitan area. Group A consists of the US, Mexico, Jamaica and Haiti; Group B contains Canada, Costa Rica, Panama, and Trinidad and Tobago. In the past, this was the Confederation of North, Central America and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF)'s sole women's football competition: the winners could call themselves queens of North America; in effect making it the equivalent of the Gold Cup for men. Indeed, it carried the name "CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup" from 2000 to 2006. However, now CONCACAF have introduce a separate competition called the "CONCACAF W Gold Cup", meaning this event, renamed the "CONCACAF W Championship", is secondary and is more notable as a way in to other competitions: it qualifies places not just for the Olympics, but also the 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup in Australia and New Zealand as well as the first edition of the W Gold Cup in 2024. In terms of the competition itself, the top two teams in each group will advance to the semifinals, and there will be a final, as well as a third-placed play-off. The winner automatically qualifies for the W Gold Cup in 2024, as well as the Olympics. The second Olympic spot will be decided in an "Olympic play-in" between the losing finalist and the winner of the third-placed play-off, which will take place in September 2023. This seems to be to avoid a situation where if the world champion Americans and Olympic champion Canadians faced each other in a semifinal then one of them would have to be eliminated, meaning CONCACAF will have weaker representation. In terms of the FIFA World Cup, all four semifinalists will qualify, while the third-placed team in each group qualifies for the intercontinental play-offs, in which ten teams from six confederations will fight for the final three spots at the World Cup. There is plenty of talent on display, but the short version of the tournament is: one team will secure an Olympic place, two teams will have to wait for a play-off next year, and the remaining five will see their Olympic dream die. Patrick Green Writer, Totallympics News
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  21. The CONCACAF Under-20 Championship is in full swing now and the Round of 16 is over. With the two finalists qualifying for the Olympics, this is the sole Paris 2024 qualifying competition in men's football for North Americans. Costa Rica faced Trinidad and Tobago at Estadio Yankel Rosenthal. A handball by Jahiem Joseph in the box gave Costa Rica the chance to make the perfect start and Josimar Alcócer stepped up to do exactly that. Costa Rica were the dominant side and added to their lead in the second half with a tap-in from Shawn Johnson. A rebound from Dorian Rodríguez made it three, before the same player latched onto a through ball for 4-0. Trinidad and Tobago were heading out but had time for one positive moment, with Molik Khan putting in the consolation. Still, an impressive performance by Costa Rica and they are through to the quarter-finals. Cuba met Panama at the Estadio Nacional. Both teams had chances in the first half but it remained a somewhat tetchy affair. And the only goal fit the contest: a scrappy goal forced in by Carlos Rivera to give Panama the win. It was a disappointment for Cuba who had been impressive in the tournament up to this point but will play no further part. Later at the Yankel Rosenthal, hosts Honduras took on Curaçao. And it didn't take long for the home side to take the lead, with Marco Aceituno latching onto a sloppy backpass. But Curaçao fought back, with Rayvian Job latching onto a "route one" ball over the top and equalising in prolific fashion. That was as good as it got for the qualifiers though, with Honduras' Geremy Rodas heading home a corner in first-half injury time and Odin Ramos heading home a cross after the break. There was time for one more Honduras goal when Nigel Marengo fouled Jefryn Macías in the box and Miguel Carrasco fired it into the top corner for a 4-1 victory. Honduras have looked impressive all tournament and will be relishing a quarterfinal against Panama. The final game of the day took place at the Estadio Nacional with the US taking on Nicaragua. The Stars and Stripes were dominant the whole game but Nicaragua's dominance was providing a large amount of frustration. It took until first half injury time for Quinn Sullivan to head them in front, but then it became much simpler. Kurt Thomas dragged Sullivan down in the box and Diego Luna scored the penalty before Sullivan tucked in a low cross for his second and the USA's third. A cross was deflected by Dylan Pineda into his own goal before Jalen Neal tucked in a rebound to give the US a 5-0 win. The Americans have looked brilliant this tournament but Costa Rica will be a tough challenge in the quarters. On the second day of competition Guatemala faced Canada in the first game at the Estadio Nacional. But nothing could separate the two sides after ninety minutes, with both teams missing a penalty in the first half but having precious little in terms of other chances. In extra-time, Canada did draw first blood, with Jeshua Urizar handling it in the box and Kamron Habibullah firing it into the bottom corner. In the 119th minute, Figo Montaro headed home, and although it was initially disallowed, VAR showed that it was onside and the game headed to penalties. With the first set of penalties converted by Gabriel Pellegrino and Carlos Santos, Kwasi Poku skied his penalty to give Guatemala the initiative, and Urizar did just that. Keesean Ferdinand levelled for Canada but Johnathan Franco put Guatemala back in front. Justin Smith's panenka then hit the bar to give Jefrey Bantes the chance to put Guatemala through, but he rolled it wide. Habibullah had to score to keep Canada in it, and did just that, so it was down to Omar Villagrán to avoid a sudden death. And he smashed it in to send Guatemala through to the quarterfinals. At the Estadio Olímpico, Haiti took on Jamaica in a bizarre game. Jahmari Clarke gave Jamaica the lead early on taking advantage of some eccentric goalkeeping and things got worse for Haiti when Fernando Ciceron's bizarre high-footed challenge on Chad James earned him a red card. A header from Steevenson Jeudy gave Haiti an equaliser and a lifeline, but when Duckens Pierre fouled Tyler Roberts that was enough for his second yellow card and Haiti were down to nine men. It was only a matter of time before Jamaica got the winner at that point and more unconvincing goalkeeping was to blame with Tarick Ximines poking home an open goal from a corner to secure a 2-1 win for the young Reggae Boyz. A fascinating encounter between El Salvador and the Dominican Republic took place at the Estadio Nacional. The qualifiers took an early lead when Israel Boatwrighit's cross went over the goalkeeper and found its way in, but El Salvador soon equalised when Mayer Gil converted a cross. However, Anyelo Gomez soon scored a rebound to put the Dominicans ahead again. El Salvador were struggling to get back into the game but when Keffler Martes brought down Jonathan Esquivel in the box Gil converted the VAR-awarded penalty to equalise, before Ronald Arévalo tapped home just before half-time to give El Salvador the lead for the first time. But just after half time, Ángel Montes De Oca managed to squeeze home a goal and it was 3-3. Boatwrighit went from hero to zero by handling a cross in the box and Esquivel converted the penalty to put El Salvador back in front, but Montes De Oca soon came forward and fired in an equaliser. And the nerves began to show when El Salvador's Alexander Romero brought down the rushing Edison Azcona in the box and Azcona got up and fired in the winner, and despite their best efforts and a disallowed goal, El Salvador had no response. The remarkable result: El Salvador 4-5 Dominican Republic, and the winners play Jamaica in the quarterfinal. In the final game at the Olímpico Mexico took on Puerto Rico in a one-sided affair. A lovely solo run from Fidel Ambriz gave El Tri a lead they would never relinquish, and Christian Torres fired off the post for two. Esteban Lozano made it three after half-time with a header, before another header from Salvador Mariscal made it four. The ball then broke kindly for Isaías Violante in the box and he took full advantage, before Jesús Hernández rounded out a 6-0 win with another headed effort. They play Guatemala in the quarters. The quarterfinals will take place on Tuesday at Estadio Morazán with the US against Costa Rica and Panama playing Honduras, and on Wednesday at Estadio Olímpico Metropolitano with the Dominican Republic taking on Jamaica and Guatemala facing Mexico. The winners will qualify for next years FIFA U-20 World Cup in Indonesia, and will be one game away from the Olympics, with the losers having no recourse for the Paris Games. Patrick Green Writer, Totallympics News
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  22. Image: World Triathlon A stunning performance from Georgia Taylor-Brown in the 2022 World Triathlon Mixed Relay Championships has yielded Great Britain the first non-host quota of the Paris 2024 Olympic cycle. The winner of the event were to win two quota spots for each gender, automatically entering the winner into the Mixed Relay event in Paris. France, the hosts of the Games, already had these quotas, so if they were to win the race the places would instead go to the runner-up. With at most three athletes per gender qualifying for the individual events per NOC, all NOCs with at least two per gender will automatically enter the mixed relay. There are also eleven specific mixed relay spots, that will automatically qualify two men and two women for the Olympics, and the second of these (after the host spot) was up for grabs in Montreal, Canada on Sunday. With Belgium non-starters, sixteen teams entered the race. In the first leg, the whole field was together after the cycling portion but New Zealand's Hayden Wilde and Great Britain's Alex Yee left the field behind them during the run, just like the individual race, and were ahead going into the second leg. During the swim, Brazil, France and Australia caught up to make it a five-woman race, putting them twenty-five seconds ahead of the US in sixth. But the charge from the chasing pack was enough to slowly claw away at the leading five, and going into the final race there was a big pack. But they slowly broke away with France's Emma Lombardi being subject of a surprise challenge from Denmark's Alberte Kjaer Pedersen. But France were happy to cooperate, as they had Vincent Luis on the penultimate leg and as Denmark fell away Luis pulled twenty seconds clear at the end of his swim. With New Zealand's Tayler Reid and the American Kevin McDowell cooperating while fighting for second, Luis was still nineteen seconds clear after the cycle despite riding solo. There was a second pack of chasers: GB, Canada, Switzerland, and Denmark, but they were a further sixteen seconds back and couldn't make any inroads despite GB's newcomer Samuel Dickinson attempting a charge. Furthermore, Dickinson had a missed box ten-second penalty. Going into the final leg France were miles in front and all Cassandre Beaugrand had to do was take it home, and in fact all she did was extend her lead. But while there was no doubt who the winner would be, it was looking a tight battle for second. Summer Rappaport of the US was now eight seconds ahead of the Kiwis' Nicole Van Der Kaay, with Taylor-Brown nearly half a minute off that silver place. But a brilliant cycle let her catch them two up somehow, but that wasn't enough: she would have to find more than seconds to contend with the penalty. Van Der Kaay tried to stay with her but ran out of steam and Taylor-Brown took a clear lead. But Rappaport, who had stayed back, was a problem. It was unclear whether Taylor-Brown was clearly ahead: she had to slow down and speed up again while serving the penalty, so the penalty is in actuality more than ten seconds. But as Beaugrand crossed the line for gold, Taylor-Brown emerged just ahead of Rappaport and powered over the line for silver while the Americans got a bronze. It means that two British men and two British women will compete at the Olympics in Paris in the triathlon, which makes a mixed relay team. The British team were delighted with the performance despite being pre-race favourites. Alex Yee said he was "absolutely over the moon", while Sophie Coldwell says she was "really proud of everyone". Samuel Dickinson whose penalty nearly cost the team said that he would "buy [Taylor-Brown] some sunglasses or something" to make up for it, while Taylor-Brown joked: But Olympic qualification aside today was France's day, and they are worthy world champions. Pierre Le Corre, Emma Lombardi, Vincent Luis and Cassandre Beaugrand are a very good team and they will be relishing an Olympics in front of their home fans. The next chance for teams to qualify will be at the 2023 World event in Hamburg, Germany. The winner of that event (or more precisely, the highest-ranked finisher except for France and Great Britain) will qualify two men and two women, similar to this event. Top five times: 1. France 1:27.14 2. Great Britain 1:27.34 3. United States 1:27.44 4. New Zealand 1:27.53 5. Canada 1:29.06 Patrick Green Writer, Totallympics News
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  23. Image: World Triathlon The first direct non-host quotas of the Paris 2024 qualification cycle are set to be allocated later today (Sunday 26 June 2022) in Montreal, Canada as the 2022 World Triathlon Mixed Relay Championships take place. The triathlon has three events: a men's event, a women's event, and a mixed relay event. All NOCs that enter at least two men and at least two women will automatically be entered into the mixed relay. However, nine NOCs will qualify directly for the mixed relay, as qualifying through these events will earn enough quotas two men and two women. The first place went automatically to hosts France, but the next will be earned at today's championships. There are seventeen countries entering, with the winner qualifying two men and two women. If France win, then the places will be allocated to the runner-up instead. In mixed relay triathlon, all teams start with a male athlete, and alternate, finishing with a female athlete (an order known as MFMF). Olympic champions Great Britain will be eyeing a win after finishing second in the last event in Leeds. The two members of their Tokyo 2020 team present, Alex Yee and Georgia Taylor-Brown both won the individual elite events, while Sophie Coldwell came 7th. Samuel Dickinson is on ranking clearly the weakest member of the team, finishing 56th in the event (out of 57 finishers). However, it is still a very strong team. Germany, who won in Leeds, do not have a team this time. They won't be troubling the Olympic quota places having already qualified as hosts but Olympic bronze medallists France who achieved the same medal in Leeds are also a strong team. Pierre Le Corre who came 7th in the individual event will lead off, followed by U23 world champion Emma Lombardi, Vincent Luis (who came 6th in the individual event) and individual silver medallist Cassandre Beaugrand. The Olympic silver medallist Americans will hope to improve from a pretty disastrous ninth in Leeds with a strong women's side. Seth Rider could only manage 40th in the individual event with Kevin Mcdowell not entering, but Taylor Spivey and Summer Rappaport managed sixth and fifth respectively in the women's event. The course consists of a 300m swim, followed by two laps of a 3.3km cycle, and then two laps of a 950m run. This will be done by each athlete, for a total of 1.2km swimming, 26.4km cycling, and 7.8km running for each team. The full list of countries, their athletes and their 2022 World Triathlon Championship Series (WTCS) ranking is as follows: Australia: Jacob Birtwhistle (32), Jaz Hedgeland (35), Brandon Copeland (17), Natalie Van Coevorden (13) Belgium: Jelle Geens (5), Valerie Barthelemy (45), Marten Van Riel (11), Hanne De Vet (86) Brazil: Miguel Hidalgo (13), Djenyfer Arnold (23), Manoel Messias (36), Vittoria Lopes (60) Canada: Tyler Mislawchuk (29), Emy Legault (29), Charles Paquet (24), Dominika Jamnicky (70) Denmark: Emil Holm (37), Alberte Kjær Pedersen (15), Oscar Gladney Rundqvist (unranked), Anne Holm (96) France: Pierre Le Corre (3), Emma Lombardi (26), Vincent Luis (6), Cassandre Beaugrand (3) Great Britain: Alex Yee (9), Sophie Coldwell (6), Samuel Dickinson (63), Georgia Taylor-Brown (1) Italy: Nicolò Strada (unranked), Bianca Seregni (unranked), Gianluca Pozzatti (49), Carlotta Missaglia (80) Japan: Takumi Hojo (16), Yuka Sato (68), Kenji Nemer (14), Hikaru Fukuoka (unranked) Mexico: Irving Perez (101), Lizeth Rueda Santos (67), Rodrigo Gonzalez (89), Anahi Alvarez Corral (88) Netherlands: Richard Murray (22), Rachel Klamer (17), Mitch Kolkman (92), Barbara De Koning (62) New Zealand: Hayden Wilde (2), Ainsley Thorpe (40), Tayler Reid (48), Nicole Van Der Kaay (24) Norway: Vetle Bergsvik Thorn (27), Lotte Miller (40), Sebastian Wernersen (unranked), Solveig Løvseth (54) Portugal: Ricardo Batista (26), Melanie Santos (34), Joao Silva (20), Maria Tomé (56) Spain: Antonio Serrat Seoane (4), Anna Godoy Contreras (92), Roberto Sanchez Mantecon (19), Sara Perez Sala (64) Switzerland: Sylvain Fridelance (18), Cathia Schär (50), Sasha Caterina (102), Nora Gmür (81) United States: Seth Rider (52), Taylor Spivey (4), Kevin Mcdowell (45), Summer Rappaport (7) Late substitutions, withdrawals or entries can't be ruled out. The action gets underway at about 16:45 local time (UTC -4). Check here for broadcasting rights. Patrick Green Writer, Totallympics News
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  24. Since our last update last month qualification procedures for five sports in the Paris 2024 Olympics have been revealed. Badminton, Canoe (Slalom and Sprint), Equestrian (Dressage, Eventing, and Jumping), Skateboarding, Sport Climbing (Boulder/Lead and Speed), and Weightlifting. Furthermore, one discipline in the sport of Cycling (Mountain bike) has also been revealed. Badminton Badminton retains its programme from Tokyo 2020, with a singles and doubles event for both genders, as well as a mixed doubles event. In singles, the top 35 athletes in the BWF 'Race to Paris Ranking List' of 30 April 2024 will qualify, with the following permutations: there can only be one athlete per NOC, or at most two if both are in the top 16. There must also be at least two athletes per continent. One place is given to the host country France, and the remaining two places are for universality. In doubles, the same BWF 'Race to Paris Ranking List' of 30 April 2024 is used for 16 pairs per event, with at most one per NOC, or at most two if both are in the top 8. If an athlete qualifies in both singles and doubles, this means that a further place is opened for the ranking list in singles. The lists are based on events between 2023 and 2024. The only change from last year is one universality place has been taken away and added to the ranking list. Canoe Slalom Canoe Slalom has received a boost from 2020 to 2024, with an Extreme Canoe Slalom event joining the Kayak and Canoe Single for both men and women. Someone who qualifies for one event can enter other events for their gender too, but at most one per NOC (two in Extreme Kayak). One athlete per NOC can qualify a place in each event, and each athlete can only qualify one quota place. 15 spots for Kayak and 12 for Canoe Single will be earned at the 2023 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships (Lee Valley, GBR, 19-24 Sep 2023). In Kayak and Canoe Single, one place for each of the five continents will be earned at Continental Qualification Tournaments (Dates and locations TBC, 2023) while one place in Kayak will go to the host nation. The three places per gender in Extreme Canoe Slalom will be at the Extreme Kayak Global Qualification Tournament (dates and locations TBC, 2024). The addition of Extreme Canoe Slalom notwithstanding, the system is largely the same as Tokyo 2020. Canoe Sprint The IOC giveth and the IOC taketh away: while Canoe Slalom gains two events, Canoe Sprint will lose two. For both genders, the Kayak Single 200m has disappeared. The other Kayak Single event (1,000m for Men and 500m for Women) has returned, as has a Kayak Double event (now 500m for both genders: it used to be 1,000m for Men), a Kayak Four 500m event, a Canoe Single event (1,000m for Men and 200m for Women), and a Canoe Double event (also now 500m for both genders instead of 1,000m for Men and 500m for Women). The quotas have also been reduced somewhat from 123 to 118 per gender. The primary event for qualification will be the 2023 ICF Canoe Sprint World Championships (Duisburg, GER, 23-27 Aug 2023). 7 boats in Kayak Single and Canoe Double, 6 in Kayak Double and Canoe Single, and 4 in Kayak Four will be earned here. There will be one host country boat in Kayak Single and Canoe Single. In every event apart from Kayak Four places will be filled at the Continental Qualification Tournaments (dates and locations TBC), with two places per continent in each event, apart from Kayak Single and Canoe Single, where Africa and Oceania will get just one place. Finally, there are two universality places per gender in the entirety of Canoe Sport, these can be allocated by the ICF in either Slalom or Sprint. At most one boat per NOC can qualify per event, although two per NOC can enter an event. The removal of the "World Cup 2" event is the biggest change from 2020. Interestingly, the document is now unavailable to access: it is listed on both the IOC and ICF site, but the file does not show up. Probably a technical gremlin, but there is a small chance this could have some meaning and the document had a mistake of some sort. Equestrian Dressage Dressage's programme is unchanged from 2020, with 60 athletes at open individual and team events. There are fifteen teams that qualify (at most one per NOC). One for the host country (France), the six highest ranked at the 2022 FEI Dressage World Championships (Herning, DEN, 6-10 Aug 2022), and the remaining nine at regional qualification events. For Groups A and B three places are earned at the 2023 FEI European Dressage Championship (Riesenbeck, GER, dates TBC), for Group C there will be a Group C 2023 Designated Olympic Qualification Event (date and location TBC) yielding one place, for Groups D and E two places are earned at the 2023 Pan American Games (Santiago, CHI, 26-29 Oct 2023), while for Group F one place is earned at the 2022 World Championships, and the same is true for Group G. The teams are made up of three athletes, and each of the three also qualify for the individual event. The remaining fifteen places (most one per NOC) will be qualified like so: the two highest-ranked athletes in the FEI Olympic Ranking (date released tbc) in Groups A, B, C, F, and G will take the first ten spots, the top two individuals from Group D or E at the 2023 Pan American Games and the top two individuals from those groups at the FEI Olympic Ranking will take up the next four spots, and finally, the top-ranked athlete irrespective of Group will get the final place. This system is the same from Tokyo 2020. Equestrian Eventing Similar to Dressage, Eventing remains unchanged since 2020 with 65 athletes in open individual and team events. Sixteen teams qualify (at most one per NOC), including the host nation. Seven places are earned at the 2022 FEI Eventing World Championships (Pratoni del Vivaro, ITA, 14-18 Sep 2022). Two teams are earned for Group A and B at the 2023 FEI European Eventing Championships (Pin du Haras, FRA, 9-13 Aug 2023). One place is earned at a Group C 2023 Designated Olympic Qualification Event (date and location TBC), while the Pan American Games (Santiago, CHI, 26-29 Oct 2023) yields two places for Groups D and E. The top two ranked teams at a Group F and G Designated Olympic Qualification Event (date and location TBC), while the final spot is earned at the FEI Eventing Nations Cup 2023 (date and location TBC) Again, the teams are made up of three teams, and each of the three also qualify for the individual event. The remaining seventeen places (at most two per NOC) through the FEI Olympic Ranking: two per group and then the highest three otherwise. This system has one more team than 2020. Equestrian Jumping Like the other Equestrian events, the Jumping programme is unchanged since 2020 with 75 athletes in open individual and team events. 20 teams qualify (at most one per NOC). There are twenty teams, including one for the host nation. Five places are earned at the 2022 FEI Jumping World Championships (Herning, DEN, 10-14 Aug 2022). The highest rated team at the FEI Jumping Nations Cup Final 2022 (Barcelona, ESP, 29 Sep-2 Oct 2022) get the next spot. The top three Group A and Group B teams at the 2023 FEI Jumping European Championship (Milano, ITA, September 2023, exact dates TBC) get spots, as do the top two at a Group C 2023 Designated Olympic Qualification Event (location and date TBC). The top three ranked Group D or E teams at the 2023 Pan American Games (Santiago, CHI, 26-29 Oct 2023) get a place, as do the top two teams at a Group F 2023 Designated Olympic Qualification Event (location and date TBC) and the highest two teams at a Group G 2023 Designated Olympic Qualification Event (location and date TBC). Finally, the highest ranked team at the FEI Jumping Nations Cup Final 2023 (date and location TBC) get a place. The three team members gain a place in the individual event, with the remaining fifteen spots (at most one per NOC) are earned like this: the top two athletes in the FEI Olympic Ranking (publication date TBC) in Groups A, B, C, F, and G get the top ten spots, with the three highest athletes at the Pan American Games getting a spot as well as the highest ranked athlete from Groups D and E. Finally, the highest-ranked athlete irrespective of group yet to qualify gets the final place. The system is similar to that from Tokyo 2020. Mountain Biking Mountain Biking has received a small hit in 2024, with 36 athletes per gender (instead of 38) in the cross-country events. The top eight NOCs in the UCI Mountain Bike Olympic Qualification ranking (published 28 May 2024) will get two spots, and the next ten will get one, for a total of 26. Three spots will be earned at the 2023 Continental Championships (dates and locations TBC) with one spot each for Africa, America, and Asia. Finally, four spots (at most one per NOC) will be earned at the 2023 UCI Mountain Bike World Championships (Glasgow and Scotland, GBR, 3-13 August 2023). Finally, one spot per gender each will be given to the host spot and universality places. The most consequential change is that no country can have three places in an event. Rowing Rowing keeps its fourteen events from 2020 (Single Sculls, Pair, Double Sculls, Four, Quadruple Sculls, Eight, Lightweight Double Sculls in both genders) but there are now 251 instead of 263 places per gender. The primary qualification event will be the 2023 World Rowing Championships (Belgrade, SRB, 3-10 Sep 2023). This will qualify eleven athletes per gender in Pair and Double Sculls, nine per gender in Single Sculls, seven per gender in Four, Quadruple Sculls, and Lightweight Double Sculls, and five per gender in Eight. Places will be available at World Rowing Continental Regattas for the four continents (dates and locations TBC, Asia and Oceania count together). Five places are available for each continent except Europe (for whom three is available) for Single Sculls, and two places for each continent except Africa (for whom one is available) in Lightweight Double Sculls. Finally, two places per event can be earned at the World Rowing Final Olympic Qualification Regatta (Lucerne, SWI, dates TBC) in around May 2024. There is also one host place as well as two universality places per NOC. The changes from Tokyo 2020 are mostly minor, and the rule that each NOC has one boat per event is retained. Skateboarding Skateboarding returns with Park and Street events for both genders, and is upgraded from 40 to 44 athletes in each gender, or 22 per event. There are 3 spots per NOC at most per event. The top 20 athletes in each event, including one per continent, in the Olympic Skateboarding Rankings of 24 June 2024 will win a spot, with the remaining places going to the host and one for universality. This is a change from 2020 where places were earned at the World Championships. Sport Climbing (Boulder/Lead) While in 2020 there was one Sport Climbing event per gender for all three disciplines combined: boulder, lead, and speed, but now speed is its own event with a combined boulder and lead event remaining. Overall, there are now 34 sport climbers per gender, up from 20. There are 20 places in the combined Boulder/Lead event, at most two per NOC. Three athletes per gender (at most one per NOC) can earn a spot at the IFSC Climbing World Championships (Bern, SUI, 1-12 Aug 2023). Five more spots per gender are earned at the IFSC Continental Qualifiers (dates and locations TBC), including the Pan American Games (Santiago, CHI, 20 Oct-5 Nov 2023), with the winner of each continental event that will be held in the last four months of 2023 gaining a spot. Finally, an Olympic Qualifier Series will take place in 2024, yielding ten spots per gender. The final places will be for the host country and the universality place. The system is similar to that from Tokyo 2020. Sport Climbing (Speed) In these events, there are fourteen places per gender (at most two per NOC). 2 spots per gender (at most one per NOC) will be earned at the IFSC Climbing World Championships (Bern, SUI, 1-12 Aug 2023). Five spots are earned per gender at the IFSC Continental Qualifiers (dates and locations TBC), including the Pan American Games (Santiago, CHI, 20 Oct-5 Nov 2023), with the winner of each continental event that will be held in the last four months of 2023 gaining a spot. Finally, an Olympic Qualifier Series will take place in 2024, yielding five spots per gender. There is also one place each for the host country and the universality place. Weightlifting Weightlifting has been downsized significantly from 2020 to 2024, with 98 athletes per gender in seven weight classes now being sixty per gender in five: for men, 61, 73, 89, 102, and +102kg; and for women, 49, 59, 71, 81, and +81kg. This is twelve athletes per event, one per NOC, and at most three athletes per NOC per gender. The top ten athletes in the IWF Olympic Qualification Ranking (OQR) will qualify a place, as will one athlete per event by Continental representation: one athlete per gender in each of the five continents: so an African in one event, an Asian in another and so on. The ranking is published on 28 April 2024. Finally, the remaining place will be either the host country (in two events per gender) or the universality place (in three). This system is similar to that from Tokyo 2020. There are still qualification procedures to be released for Aquatics, Athletics, Football, Sailing, Surfing, Table Tennis, and Tennis, as well as the rest of Cycling: so 8 sports in total. Patrick Green Writer, Totallympics News
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  25. Mkbw50

    Paris 2024 schedule revealed

    On 1 April, the schedule for Paris 2024 has been released, and with just over two years until the Games to go, there has been plenty of time to dissect it and look at some key dates. Remember, all times given are Paris time (UTC +2). The Games takes place over nineteen days. The day of the opening ceremony ("Day 0") is 26 July 2024, with some preliminary action starting in the two days before that, and then events taking place up until Day 16 (11 August), with the closing ceremony taking place once all the sport has finished. In 2020, Softball and Football were the only sports to begin before the day of the Opening Ceremony. Softball is of course not in Paris 2024, but Football retains that status, with two games in every stadium before the games begin: one game on Day -2 and one game on Day -1 for every stadium, except for the Parc des Princes in Paris, where two games will be on Day -2. The finals will be on Day 14 and Day 15 once again, both at the Parc des Princes. Kick-off times vary from 15:00 at the earliest to 21:00 at the latest, with the finals at 18:00 and 18:30 respectively. Another sport to begin before the Opening Ceremony is Rugby Sevens, which has action on both Day -2 and Day -1, with the Finals on Day 1 and Day 4: the final sessions will begin at 14:30.Tthe sport being earlier in the Games is because the sport is sharing the Stade de France with Athletics, which will have consecutive days of action from Day 7 to Day 15, with morning sessions (10:00-13:00) every day from Day 7 to Day 14: all medals will be handed out in the evenings (19:00-22:00). The Marathons, from the Hôtel de Ville to Invalides will be on Day 15 and Day 16, both beginning at 08:00, while the Race Walks on Pont d'Iéna will begin at 07:30 on Day 6 and Day 12: likely meaning the men's and women's events will be on the same day leaving the other one free for the new mixed relay. Handball at the Pierre Mauroy Stadium also begins before the Opening Ceremony and will be the first sport to begin, with action on both Days -2 and -1. It is also the only sport to take place on Day 0, with a session beginning at 09:00. It started after the Ceremony in Tokyo, but Handball does have a packed programme, with four two-hour sessions on some days. The finals are on Days 13 and 14, with the bronze matches from 16:30 and the gold matches from 21:00, a change from Tokyo where the final event was on the final day. Finally, the beginning of the Archery at Invalides is now on Day -1 instead of Day 0. Archery will resume on Day 2, with constant action until Day 9. The finals are on Days 2, 3, and 7 at 14:15 and Days 8 and 9 at 13:00. Beach Volleyball at the Eiffel Tower Stadium will be a constant, beginning at 10:00 on Day 1 and not finishing until Day 15, with action every day in between. The finals are at 21:00 on Day 14 and Day 15. Judo will also begin on Day 1 at the Champs de Mars Arena, with morning sessions mostly starting at 10:00, and the evening sessions were medals are handed out beginning at 16:00. This will last until Day 8, and Wrestling will take over the arena on Day 10, with morning and evening sessions. On Day 11, the medals will be handed out on on sessions beginning at 18:15, with this being the case for every day until Day 16, the day of the opening ceremony, where the session takes place at 11:00. Fencing is another sport to start with medals from Day 1 at the Grand Palais. There will be morning and evening sessions every day until Day 9, with the medals all handed out in the evening: sessions start from 19:00 to 19:30. On Day 12, Taekwondo will start in the same place, with three sessions per day for four days: the medals all handed out in the evening again, in sessions touted to last from 19:30 to 23:00. This is a change from Tokyo, where Taekwondo was in the first four days. In Road Cycling, the Time Trial from Invalides to Pont Alexandre III will be on Day 1, beginning at 14:30. The Road Races from Pont d'Iéna will take place on Day 8 and Day 9 (the 'middle weekend'), with the men's event on Saturday starting at 11:00 and the women's event at 14:00 on the Sunday. It seems there is a lot of emphasis on popular events taking place on these two days, which could explain the switch: in 2020 the road race was before the time trial. Skateboarding street events will take place on the first two days at La Concorde, which is the home of urban sports during the Games, with the early session from 12:00 and the evening one from 17:00 where medals are won. Park events are on Day 11 and Day 12, with all start times thirty minutes earlier than the street counterpart. BMX Freestyle events will also happen here, with a session on Day 4 and the medal session on Day 5 both starting at 14:00. Breaking, an all new sport, will take place on Days 14 and 15, with sessions at 16:00 and 20:00, the latter of which will see medals handed out. Basketball 3x3 is the most packed sport to happen at this venue, with action beginning on Day 4 and going non-stop until Day 10 with medals handed out in the final session beginning at 21:00. Tennis will take place at the famous Roland Garros, with all medals handed out on the P. Chatrier court. It will begin on Day 1 at 12:00, with the first medal handed out on Day 7 in a session starting at 19:00, but most handed out on the middle weekend again, with medals sessions on both days starting at 12:00. Boxing will also take place on the Suzanne Lenglen court, with action starting on Day 1 at 19:30 and preliminary sessions on Days 2 to 9 beginning at 10:30 and 19:30. After a break on Day 10, medals will be handed out on sessions on Days 11 to 15 starting at 20:00. Volleyball will once again be in action every day the flame is lit, starting at South Paris Arena on Day 1. The bronze matches will be on Day 14 at 17:00 and Day 15 at 13:00, with the finals on Day 15 at 17:00 and Day 16 at 13:00. Table Tennis takes place on every day from Day 1 to Day 15 this time, with medals handed out in sessions starting at 13:30 on Days 4, 8, and 9, and sessions starting at 15:00 on Days 14 and 15. Weightlifting has been compressed into the final five days of the Games, with medals being earned in every session: starting at 15:00 and 19:30 on the first three days, at 11:30, 16:00 and 20:30 on Day 15 and just the 11:30 session on Day 16. Artistic Gymnastics preliminaries at the Bercy Arena will take place on Days 1 and 2, with finals from Days 3 to 5 at 17:30, on Day 6 at 18:00, on Day 8 at 15:30, Day 9 at 15:00, and Day 10 at 13:00. The one-day gap is because Trampoline Gymnastics will have both medals on one day, with sessions at 12:00 and 18:00. The other event to take place at the arena will be Basketball. This starts at a location tbc with four preliminary games (the first starting at 11:00) each day from Day 1 to Day 9, with the final phase starting on Day 11. The finals will be on Day 15, with a bronze match at 18:00 and the final at 21:30, and on Day 16, with a bronze match at 10:30 and the final at 14:00. Badminton is the very first sport to start on Day 1 with action from Porte de La Chapelle Arena starting at 08:30. The finals start from 15:00 from Days 7 to 9, with two finals sessions on Day 10 starting at 09:45 and 14:30. Rhythmic Gymnastics also takes place here, starting on Day 13 and with finals sessions being on Day 14 at 14:30 and Day 15 at 14:00: this is a day earlier than 2020. Swimming will begin from Paris La Defense Arena on Day 1 with a uniform schedule from Day 1 to Day 8 with a preliminary session at 11:00 and a final session at 20:30, and then on Day 9 just a final session beginning at 18:30. This means that on Day 7 to Day 9, the Athletics and Swimming finals will clash, which will be disappointing to many. Water Polo will begin at the Aquatics Centre on Day 1 and go on every day there until Day 9, before moving to the Paris La Defense Arena, now vacated of swimmers, on Day 10. The medal matches will take place at 09:00 (bronze) and 14:00 (gold) on the final two days: water polo will therefore once again be the final event to end. Diving will also take place at the Aquatics Centre, with finals slipped in where gaps on the Water Polo schedule exist on Days 1, 3, 5, and 7 at 11:00 (likely the synchronised events) before action properly resumes on Day 10, with finals on Days 11, 13, 14 and 15 beginning at 15:00. Artistic Swimming, the final sport at the Aquatics Centre has sessions beginning at 19:30 every day from Day 10 to Day 15 apart from Day 13, the medals are handed out on Days 12 and 15. Shooting from La Corneuve will likely as per usual have the first medal handed out, with Rifle/Pistol medals handed out each of the first ten days in sessions starting at 09:00 except Days 5 and 10. Shotgun action will start on Day 3, with medals handed out on Days 4, 5, and 8 from 15:30 and Days 9 and 10 at 15:00. Modern Pentathlon will also get underway here with the Fencing Ranking Round on Day 13, before moving to Château de Versailles on Day 14. The laser runs start on Day 15 at 17:00 and Day 16 at 11:00: meaning the programme has been stretched by a day. The Château will mostly be known as the home of Equestrian however, with action beginning on Day 1 and sessions every day up to Day 11, with finals on Days 3, 6, 8 and 9 starting from 10:00-11:00, and on Day 11 starting at 14:00. Rowing started on Day 0 in 2020 but all action will be with a lit flame in 2024, with Vaires-sur-Marne Nautical Stadium seeing action every day from Day 1 to Day 8. 09:30 is the start time on Days 5 to 8, the days where medals will be won. Canoe Slalom will also take place here on all of the first ten days apart from Day 7, with finals starting at 15:30 on Days 2, 3, 5, 6, and 10. Finally, Canoe Sprint begins on Day 11 with action for five days, medals handed out on the last three of those with sessions beginning at 09:30. Yves-du-Manoir Stadium is the home of Hockey, and action starts from Day 1 and goes on for fourteen days. The bronze matches (14:00) and gold matches (19:00) take place on the last two days, similar to 2020. Surfing takes place in Teahupo'o in Tahiti, on the other side of the world. There is action on each of the first four days, beginning at 19:00, which is 07:00 local time. All medals are handed out on Day 4. Sailing from Marseille Marina begins on Day 2 with action every day until Day 13 starting at 11:00, and medal races on Days 6, 7, 11, 12 and 13. This was so that sailers could attend the opening ceremony. The Triathlon events at Pont Alexandre III start at 08:00 on Days 4, 5, and 10. Also taking place there is the Marathon Swimming, beginning on Days 13 and 14 at 07:30. Golf from the Golf National has its events from Day 6 to 9 and Day 12 to 15, starting at 09:00 each day. Sport Climbing from Le Bourget Sport Climbing Venue begins on Day 10, with a medal handed out each day from Day 11 to Day 14 at 17:00. Track Cycling from Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines Velodrome also begins on Day 10, with medals handed out every day afterwards with sessions starting from 17:00-18:00 (apart from Day 16 where the session starts at 11:00): preliminary afternoon sessions also exist on Days 12 and 14. There is a slight overlap with the Athletics finals: the final hour of proceedings will overlap with the first hour of athletics, although for fans of both this should be manageable. This is a lot of sports to pack in, and the full schedule for your favourite sport is in this document, and of course everything is subject to change (and often will, with weather often moving rowing and sailing events in particular). However, here are some points to highlight: Athletics and Swimming to clash The Games' show-piece sports are scheduled around each other, with swimming in the first half of the games and athletics in the second half. However, just like Tokyo 2020, they will clash, with Day 7, 8, and 9 seeing both sports having action simultaneously. In 2020, this problem was worked around by having swimming finals in the morning session, but this doesn't seem to be the case this time. Fans of both sports will be disappointed in having to split attention. Most finals in the evening Swimming's reluctance to have finals in the morning seem part of a broader shift to having more finals in the evening. Perhaps this is due to the lucrative American broadcasters not wanting to have events in the middle of the night, which is understandable. But it does mean that more finals will take place together than in 2020, leaving to more multi-screen viewing for the TV audience. A focus on the 'middle weekend' Days 8 and 9 of the Games, the 'middle weekend', have been singled out for particular attention by organisers. As well as the finals in both Athletics and Swimming, there will also be finals in Tennis and Artistic Gymnastics, as well as the Cycling Road Races. The Games' most illustrious sports and those most popular in France will be very prevalent. Also present are Table Tennis. Team sports "spread out" On the final four days, the long team sports will come to an end, but they have been scheduled not to clash. The finals of volleyball, beach volleyball, hockey, handball, basketball, water polo and football will not clash. This could explain the increase in sports starting before the flame is lit, although another explanation is to make it so athletes can attend the Opening Ceremony, which might not have been the case with an early Day 1 start: a match on Day -2 or Day -1 would make this a bit easier. The schedule has been made so all athletes can attend at least one ceremony. Patrick Green Writer, Totallympics News
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  26. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has today revealed four more qualifying procedures, meaning more than half of the qualifying procedures for Paris 2024 are now known. Fencing, Golf, Judo and Taekwondo have all released their qualifying systems. Fencing Fencing has twelve events, six per gender: Individual Foil, Epée and Sabre events, and team equivalents. Just like 2020, there are a total of 106 athletes per gender. For each event, if an NOC qualifies a team, then the three team members also take part in the corresponding individual event. Otherwise, only one athlete can participate per NOC in the individual event (this is similar to Archery). For each team event, eight teams will qualify. The team members will take up 24 places in the individual events, with ten individuals qualifying for a maximum of 34. When universality and host places are added, an individual event can have at most 37 places. There is one male and one female universality place in total, and the hosts have six places, in addition to any places they qualify. All team places will be earned from the FIE official Senior Team Ranking List of 1 April 2024, with all four zones guaranteed at least one place if they have a team in the top 16. The ten individual places will be qualified as follows: six from the FIE Individual Senior Adjusted Official Ranking List of April 2024, discriminated by zone, with two for Europe and Asia-Oceania and one for America and Africa, and the winners of four FIE Zonal Qualifying Events in April 2024 (exact dates and locations tbc). The only change to the 2020 system is two host places have gone to the universality section. Golf Golf has a men's and women's event, and just like 2020, sixty golfers of each gender will participate at the Olympics. And the qualification system is unchanged too. There is one host spot, and 59 qualification spots. The Olympic Golf Ranking (17 June for men and 24 June for women) is the only qualification pathway. There are at most four athletes per NOC, but only if they are in the top fifteen: otherwise there is at most two. Also, there is a guaranteed place for all five continents. Finally, if the host spot is unused (as is likely) it will be a universality place instead. Judo Judo's programme is unchanged from 2020, with seven men's weight classes (60, 66, 73, 81, 90, 100, and +100kg), seven women's weight classes (48, 52, 57, 63, 70, 78, and +78kg) and a mixed team event. However, they have had their quotas reduced, with 186 men and 186 women, down from 193 of each in 2016 (so one less athlete per individual event). There is no direct qualification for the mixed team event: instead, if you have six eligible athletes (one man and one women from the three lightest classes, the three middle classes, and three heaviest classes) you automatically enter. Each individual event has at most one athlete per NOC. For each event, France will qualify a place. The top seventeen highest ranked athletes on the IJF World Ranking List (published 25 June 2024) for each event will qualify a place. Then, 100 additional places in total (50 per gender) will be qualified through Continental Rankings, listing all athletes in all events, separated per continent. The top 12 Africans in both genders, the top 13 European men and 12 European women, the top ten Asians in both genders, the top five Oceanians in both genders, and the top 10 Pan American men and 11 Pan American women will qualify. However, out of these 100 places, there is at most one per NOC. Finally, there are five Team invitation places: one NOC per continent that has five out of the six athletes necessary to qualify for the Mixed Team event will have the extra judoka qualified, so they can participate. There are also fifteen universality places. This system is similar to 2020's system. Taekwondo Taekwondo is another sport to be unchanged from 2020, with four men's weight classes (58, 68, 80, and +80kg) and four women's weight classes (49, 57, 67 and 67kg). Each event has sixteen places, although athletes from the Refugee Olympic Team might be added as a seventeenth. There is one athlete per NOC per event. There are fifteen qualification spots per event, with either one of the two host spots per gender or one of the two universality places per gender to make up the sixteenth place. Five athletes per event qualify from the WT Olympic Ranking published on 6 January 2024. The winner of the WT Grand Slam Champions Series (Wuxi, CHN, 16-17 Dec 2023) in each event qualifies one spot, with the remaining nine spots earned at the Continental Qualification Tournaments, two for every continent apart from Oceania, which just gets one. These four systems are all very similar to 2020, and are all mostly rankings based. Fifteen sports (Aquatics, Athletics, Badminton, Canoe, Cycling, Equestrian, Football, Rowing, Sailing, Skateboarding, Sport Climbing, Surfing, Tennis, Table Tennis and Weightlifting) are yet to publish their system. Patrick Green Writer, Totallympics News
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