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Winter Universiade 2019

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Final Medal Standing

 

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Finally got the time to continue watching, I'm now at the biathlon single mixed relay....I just can not for the life of me understand why FISU still goes with these absolutely horrendous graphics in biathlon :cry:

 

It's somewhat acceptable in individual competitions, but in relays they don't even show the misses properly, so you end up seeing a bunch of targets with a random amount of black/white circles and no clue about how many shots have been fired on that target.

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Also it took me 10 minutes to understand the commentator was not talking about 'spears' but about 'spares', which they have to use after a 'muss'.

Edited by heywoodu

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16 minutes ago, heywoodu said:

Also it took me 10 minutes to understand the commentator was not talking about 'spears' but about 'spares', which they have to use after a 'muss'.

You’d love the international feeds at the Olympics then, same guy there

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12 minutes ago, Olympian1010 said:

You’d love the international feeds at the Olympics then, same guy there

So glad German TV and Dutch Eurosport exist.

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1 hour ago, heywoodu said:

So glad German TV and Dutch Eurosport exist.

Not for replay purposes though... 

Welcome to the dark side 

  • Haha 1

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Ice Hockey Recap

W

 

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Russian women win Universiade

 

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Russia’s women took gold at the 2019 Winter Universiade in Krasnoyarsk with a 2-0 win over Canada. The host nation topped a six-team round robin in fine style before blanking the USA and Canada in the knock-out games.

In the bronze medal game, Japan edged Team USA in overtime.
 
As host nation, Russia was determined to put on a show for its fans in central Siberia. The roster featured many players with high-level international experience, including 14 of the team that played at last year’s Winter Olympics in PyeongChang. Alexei Chistyakov also combined his role as head coach of the national team with a position behind the bench for this student roster, while GM Vladislav Prodan highlighted Universiade’s value as preparation for the upcoming Women’s World Championship in Finland.
 
Canada, meanwhile, drew on a roster with rather less top-level experience. However, head coach Stacey Colarossi’s team gave the Russians their toughest test in a 4-2 group stage loss to finish second out of six teams in that round robin. In the final, once again, the Canadians made things hard for Russia: a gritty tactical battle remained goalless until the 50th minute when Liana Ganeyeva’s centre point shot found the target to put Russia in front. Fanuza Kadirova, a former captain of Russia’s U18 roster, put up the screen in front of Jessica Vance as her team-mate from Gorny Ukhta fired home the vital goal on the power play. Home gold was secured in the last minute when Alevtina Shtaryova, another Olympian, scored into an empty net.
 
“My emotions are running wild,” Ganeyeva told the Russian Hockey Federation after the game. “This was a tough game, Canada is a fast, energetic team. But all our girls did great: nobody gave up, everyone battled to the last. My goal was just part of the game. You need to put your best into every shot, to do everything you can to get it in the net. I put my heart and soul into it and the girls were brilliant screening their goalie.”
 
“It’s another medal for my collection. I’m tired after the tournament, but I can barely feel the fatigue because we won. Every victory, every award, every medal means so much to me.”
 
Head coach Chistyakov added: “It was a really hard game, worthy of any final. We got nervous, things weren’t working out for us, especially at the start. In the first period we had 20 shots on their net but the goalie was superb and we couldn’t score. Then our emotions got out of hand in the second and we started making silly mistakes. Our goalie, Nadya Morozova, got us out of jail. Fortunately we could put that right in the third and get in front.”
 
Russia’s journey to the final was impressive. In the group phase, the host nation won all five games and outscored the opposition 45-3. That set up a semi-final against the USA and, for the second time in the tournament, the Russians won by a 10-0 margin. Canada, runner-up in the group, booked its place in the final with a victory over Japan.
 
The Japanese went on to claim bronze, beating the USA 2-1 in overtime. Yoshino Enomoto, a defenceman who was part of her country’s Olympic Qualifying campaign but did not make the party in Korea, potted the winning goal. Earlier, Kathleen McNamara gave the Americans a first-period lead but Chisato Miyazaki cancelled out that effort in the 17th minute.
 
This year’s Universiade also saw Switzerland send a team for the first time. It proved to be a steep learning curve for the 2021 host nation, with the Swiss losing all five of their group games by an aggregate score of 31-5. China suffered the heaviest loss of the competition, going down 13-1 against Russia, but defeated Switzerland 3-0 to come in fifth.
 
The scoring charts, not surprisingly, were dominated by the Russians. Valeriya Pavlova led the way with 14 (10+4) points from seven games. Canada’s Katryne Villeneuve was second with 11 (6+5), the only non-Russian in the top eight.

 

IIHF.com

 

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Final Ranking
1. :RUS  Russia
2. :CAN  Canada
3. :JPN  Japan
4. :USA  United States
5. :CHN  China
6. :SUI  Switzerland

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Ice Hockey Recap

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Third student crown for Russia

 

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Russia won Universiade gold for the third tournament in a row when the men’s team defeated Slovakia 2-1 in Tuesday’s final in Krasnoyarsk. The final scoreline was a repeat of the opening game of the tournament, although on this occasion the Russians managed to seal things up in 60 minutes.

Russia dominated the game throughout – the shot count finished 54-16 in favour of the home team – but Slovak goalie Matej Tomek was in superb form and continually frustrated the home offence. Tomek, who plays for the University of Nebraska in Omaha, kept Russia at bay until the 36th minute when a solo effort from Maxim Dzhioshvili opened the scoring. That lead was shortlived as Sebastian Smida tied the score 90 seconds later.

However, Russia got the winner at the start of the third when Dmitry Kolgotin exploded out from behind the net to beat Tomek.

“Everyone on the ice worked so hard to get that goal,” said Kolgotin, one of 10 players on the roster registered with the Smolensk Academy of Physical Education. “I can’t say I did anything special, it felt like it was my first shot in the game. I just saw a gap and went for it. It’s true what they say, if you go to the net, things happen for you.

“Scoring the winner is a great feeling, especially since this is the first time I’ve been called up to any national team.”

Russia’s success ensured a sweep of hockey gold at this tournament after the women won gold yesterday. It also makes its five golds from six Universiade tournaments for the men. You have to go back to Slovakia’s 2001 triumph to find the last time the Red Machine missed out on a medal at this student event.

This year’s roster was a strong one, with eight of the roster gaining at least some KHL experience in the current season. The remainder were drawn from the VHL, Russia’s second-tier pro league; some of them, like Metallurg Novokuznetsk forward Yegor Morozov, boasted extensive KHL experience.

Slovakia, which medalled for the first time since a bronze in 2009, also boasted an experienced KHLer: defenceman Patrik Bacik, 24, spent the bulk of the season with Slovan Bratislava and has made three international appearances for his country.

Russia’s head coach Vladislav Khromykh, who was also behind the bench two years ago when his team triumphed in Kazkahstan, paid tribute to Slovakia’s performance.

“Slovakia is a team with character and great spirit, they played well on defence and their goalie was great,” he told the Russian Hockey Federation website. “We wanted to play the right way and, as far as possible, stay out of the box because we’d seen how dangerous the Slovak power play could be. And we managed to do that. The tournament was at a very high level, everything was great on and off the ice. I’m thrilled that we’ve managed to win the Universiade on home ice.”

The two nations dominated Group A of the competition in Central Siberia, separated only by that overtime win for Russia at the start of the contest. In the semi-finals, Russia won a tempestuous game against Canada 5-1 while Slovakia blanked Kazakhstan in a 4-0 success.

The bronze medal went to Canada after a 3-0 victory over Kazakhstan. Goalie Sebastien Auger stopped 39 shots, while second-period goals from Aidan Wallace and Daniel Del Paggio, scored just 42 seconds apart, swung the game in the Canadians’ favour. Stephen Harper’s empty net effort secured a third successive bronze for his country in this tournament, Canada has collected a medal in the last seven Universiade events. The victory in the bronze medal game avenged Kazakhstan’s 4-3 win when the teams met in the group stage. Kazakhstan topped Group B but was left without a medal after taking silver at the last three games.

The Kazakhs dominated the individual honours. Valery Gurin of Nomad Astana was the leading scoring with 17 (5+12) points; Anton Nekryach was second on 14 (9+5). Slovakia’s Daniel Rzavsky completed the top three, tying with Canada’s Harper and Russia’s Denis Orlovich-Grudkov at 10 points.

 

IIHF.com

 

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Final Ranking
1. :RUS  Russia
2. :SVK  Slovakia
3. :CAN  Canada
4. :KAZ  Kazakhstan
5. :CZE Czech Republic
6.
:LAT  Latvia

7. :USA United States

8. :SUI Switzerland

9. :HUN Hungary

10. :GBR Great Britain

11. :JPN Japan

12. :SWE Sweden

 

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7 hours ago, Olympian1010 said:

Not for replay purposes though... 

Which is fun, but a billion times less important than the live (or semi-live in case of having to record something) version of watching events, especially during the Olympics.

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