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thiago_simoes

[OFF TOPIC] Weird or different terms related to sports in your language

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I was reading the list of topics and the national thread of Slovakia had the sentence "Cesta do Tokia" added to it. Then I remembered that in Portuguese we usually say "cesta" (literally: basket) when someone scores (one, two or three points, it doesn't matter) in basketball. This made me curious about other languages, since there might be different or unique terms related to sports and we have people from all over the world here, so I would like us to share what we might know.

As a side note, it's amusing that in Portuguese the name of the country Peru refers to both turkey (the animal, not the country) and a penis. Their slogan, "arriba Perú", is sometimes understood by Portuguese speakers as "rise up, cock". :lol:

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Cesta (read - Tsesta) is Road in Slovak and Czech languages :d  and Perú in Slovak language literally means They wash (in washing machine) :p

 

 

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I feel like the majority of you probably most of our English slang when it comes to sports, but I’d be happy to share if you guys want me to

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13 minutes ago, hckosice said:

Cesta (read - Tsesta) is Road in Slovak and Czech languages :d  and Perú in Slovak language literally means They wash (in washing machine) :p

 

 

road we say put, but in some areas cesta is also used :d

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1 minute ago, DaniSRB said:

road we say put, but in some areas cesta is also used :d

 

Can I guess, somewhere around Vojvodina ? :d

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Just now, hckosice said:

 

Can I guess, somewhere around Vojvodina ? :d

no, Republika Srpska :d

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Well, after spending so many time in NZ, I learned it's better to use word "cheer" when I want to cheer for some team, athlete, or anyone instead of "root" cause it means something very different :lol: Of course, paired with for, has the same meaning as cheer for but... you never know :d 

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3 minutes ago, DaniSRB said:

no, Republika Srpska :d

 

Wow, that´s quite surprising :)

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We use fight for every sport and every activity in Italy... like "Le ragazze del sincronizzato lotteranno per l'oro" (the syncronette girls will fight for the gold) :p  

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Oh!! In the US, we tell kids to shag the balls (which means retrieve them from outside or off the field) in youth sports. Apparently, and this is according to some visiting British football coaches, it has a very different meaning in the UK :d

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il y a 37 minutes, thiago_simoes a déclaré:

I was reading the list of topics and the national thread of Slovakia had the sentence "Cesta do Tokia" added to it. Then I remembered that in Portuguese we usually say "cesta" (literally: basket) when someone scores (one, two or three points, it doesn't matter) in basketball. This made me curious about other languages, since there might be different or unique terms related to sports and we have people from all over the world here, so I would like us to share what we might know.

As a side note, it's amusing that in Portuguese the name of the country Peru refers to both turkey (the animal, not the country) and a penis. Their slogan, "arriba Perú", is sometimes understood by Portuguese speakers as "rise up, cock". :lol:

 

Same in french: 'panier' (litteral translation of basket) is used when someone scores. The term 'basket' is commonly used to name the sport when basketball connoisseurs tend to prefer to use the full term of 'basketball' (in a kind of 'I'm better than you' way :d)

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btw a bit weird..but well, let´s go. During the PyeongChang Olympics Women´s Ice Hockey final our consultant of the commentator when speaking about one nice shot and goal said one memorable sentence - "She did it perfectly, what a shot it was, look, how she find a hole between her legs."  ofc he immediately realized what he said but it was too late :lol: practically the whole nation still remember it and is still used as a common joke :p

 

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