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thiago_simoes

[OFF TOPIC] Weird or different terms related to sports in your language

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vinipereira    944
2 hours ago, thiago_simoes said:

I was reading the list of topics and the national thread of Slovakia had the sentence "Cesta do Tokia" added to it.

 

Not related to this topic, but another national thread title that made me stop for a second was the Poland one: Droga do Tokio 2020.

 

(in portuguese, droga literally means drug, but also a very common word to express anger or frustration)

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Vojthas    58

I've got many - right now I'm doing a Hungarian-Polish-English sport dictionary for my master's degree, so the topic is really interesting for me. For example searching for "scissor kick" in football (called soccer in AmE) in Hungarian I found word "ollózás", which means scissoring. I checked in Google, if ollózás is really, what I'm looking for and... well, it is, but among the movies showing such a spectacular kick there were some... lesbian intercourses.

 

The one with "basket" ("kosz" in Polish) seems to be a case in many languages, for example "rzucić kosza" (throw a basket) means to score.

 

As well as @Gianlu33 said about Italian, we also use "fight" in all sports.

 

In field hockey the stick is called "laska", which is also popular word for an attractive, young woman (probably because of the slim shape of a stick, not only in field hockey, but also the one used by elder people to help at walking).

 

The word "canoe" (not the kayak) is "kanadyjka" which means (written with capital - "Kanadyjka") the Canadian [woman, girl...].

 

The ski-flying hill is called "skocznia mamucia" which means "mammoth hill".

 

Also the "body check" came to Polish in a form of "bodiczek" (in Hungarian it's also "bodicsek"). My theory (maybe someone might confirm) is it was used by Czechs and Slovaks, which are the most hockey nations in our region, in original, English form, but as it sounds very Czech/Slovak, we adopted it as the word of Czech/Slovak origin, which is (at least in Polish) important because of declination.

 

In modern pentathlon, before the name "laser-run" was introducted we used the word "kombajn" in everyday talk (rather not in official press reports), because it sounds like a "combined" which was the name of the event of run and shoot. "Kombajn" is a word for a harvester machine. Also Russians used such a word (our languages are quite similar) and when I typed the Russian texts about competitions to Google Translate it translated as "food processor..."

 

About such a funny stories as @hckosice said about hole, our biggest sport journalism legend, Bohdan Tomaszewski, once said about Irena Szewińska "Pani Irena nie jest już tak świeża w kroku jak kiedyś" which may mean to thing - "she's not as fresh in stride as earlier" (which is what he meant as she was a runner) or "she's not as fresh in crotch as earlier" (which is why the sentence is so funny).

Another double meaning, also by Mr Tomaszewski, about our cyclist - "Ryszard Szurkowski - cudowne dziecko dwóch pedałów" - "Ryszard Szurkowski - a wonderful child of two pedals" ("pedał" is also a vulgar word for homosexual).
 

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hckosice    1,783
5 hours ago, Vojthas said:

 

In field hockey the stick is called "laska", which is also popular word for an attractive, young woman (probably because of the slim shape of a stick, not only in field hockey, but also the one used by elder people to help at walking).

 

 

Also the "body check" came to Polish in a form of "bodiczek" (in Hungarian it's also "bodicsek"). My theory (maybe someone might confirm) is it was used by Czechs and Slovaks, which are the most hockey nations in our region, in original, English form, but as it sounds very Czech/Slovak, we adopted it as the word of Czech/Slovak origin, which is (at least in Polish) important because of declination.

 


 

 

Láska is in CZ/SK love :)

btw there a lot of similar words between our nations, I remember quickly that in Ice Hockey for the penalty you use the word "Kára" which in our language mean Funeral Carriage lol. and in other sports, for example Ball is in PL - Pilka (Football - Pilka nožna) right ? Pilka is in our language a Hand saw :lol:

 

Spoiler

but still the most funny and literally explicit word is your word for searching :dszukac, szukaj in CZ/SK as you probably know it means - Fu.king.

 

https://spanie.pl/a/89/Slowackie_pulapki_jezykowe.html

 

And you are right. Body Check came from N. American hockey here, peoples started to use it as it sounds really similar to our language and was thus easier to remember, so we just adapted it to our writing - Bodyček.

 

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phelps    516
Posted (edited)
10 ore fa, vinipereira ha scritto:

 

Not related to this topic, but another national thread title that made me stop for a second was the Poland one: Droga do Tokio 2020.

 

(in portuguese, droga literally means drug, but also a very common word to express anger or frustration)

 

Droga means "drug" also in Italian (actually, between Italian and Portuguese and Spanish there are a lot of words with similar meaning)...

but when it comes to the ITA vs POR translation, the most "tricky" word is the verb "ficar", which is "to stay" or "to put" (I don't know the exact use of that in POR)...

so, if you use the imperative form, it sounds "fica...and so on"...but in Italian that world literally means "vagina" (and it's not the medical version for that, since in this case you have to say "vagina" -pronounced "vageena"- also here)...:lol:

p.s. some of you might also have geard the word "figa", which is exactly the same (it's used in many regions, especially in Northern Italy instead of the proper Italian word with the "c")...on the other side, if it's written and said in the male version ("figo") literally means "cool"...it's not a word you should use in a formal speech, but nowadays is normally accepted also on tv broadcasts at least)...

 

Edited by phelps
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Monzanator    67
Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, hckosice said:

 

Láska is in CZ/SK love :)

btw there a lot of similar words between our nations, I remember quickly that in Ice Hockey for the penalty you use the word "Kára" which in our language mean Funeral Carriage lol. and in other sports, for example Ball is in PL - Pilka (Football - Pilka nožna) right ? Pilka is in our language a Hand saw :lol:

 

  Reveal hidden contents

but still the most funny and literally explicit word is your word for searching :dszukac, szukaj in CZ/SK as you probably know it means - Fu.king.

 

https://spanie.pl/a/89/Slowackie_pulapki_jezykowe.html

 

And you are right. Body Check came from N. American hockey here, peoples started to use it as it sounds really similar to our language and was thus easier to remember, so we just adapted it to our writing - Bodyček.

 

 

Kara in Polish means penalty or punishment so you're right about that ;) However pilka also means hand saw in Polish :) It's generally a term for any kind of a ball in first place.

 

Hand saw:

 

08827b5c45c78f86c52e83029407

 

Football magazine:

 

tygodnik4_rpnqsnp.jpg

 

Dostoyevski's "Crime & Punishment"

 

4763277-600-600-0-a-0-b9f77aef00870d7c6d

Edited by Monzanator
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thiago_simoes    209
14 horas atrás, phelps disse:

 

Droga means "drug" also in Italian (actually, between Italian and Portuguese and Spanish there are a lot of words with similar meaning)...

but when it comes to the ITA vs POR translation, the most "tricky" word is the verb "ficar", which is "to stay" or "to put" (I don't know the exact use of that in POR)...

so, if you use the imperative form, it sounds "fica...and so on"...but in Italian that world literally means "vagina" (and it's not the medical version for that, since in this case you have to say "vagina" -pronounced "vageena"- also here)...:lol:

p.s. some of you might also have geard the word "figa", which is exactly the same (it's used in many regions, especially in Northern Italy instead of the proper Italian word with the "c")...on the other side, if it's written and said in the male version ("figo") literally means "cool"...it's not a word you should use in a formal speech, but nowadays is normally accepted also on tv broadcasts at least)...

 


I knew about "fica" because I watched an interview with singer Mafalda Minnozzi (she's moderately famous in Brazil and she speaks Portuguese quite well) and she said she brought her parents to visit Brazil once and the first thing that was said to them was "fica a vontade" (literally "stay as you wish", but it actually means "make yourself home"). I can imagine they have a bad opinion about us and our fascination about "fica". :lol:

Also, we use the word "figa" in Brazil to refer to the gesture of putting your thumb between your index and middle finger. I was told this gesture is quite obscene in Italy, but in Brazil it means a way to superstitiously protect yourself against curses and bad luck (and it was appropriated by African-Brazilian religions as a way for one to protect oneself from bad things). 

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phelps    516
Posted (edited)
10 ore fa, thiago_simoes ha scritto:


I knew about "fica" because I watched an interview with singer Mafalda Minnozzi (she's moderately famous in Brazil and she speaks Portuguese quite well) and she said she brought her parents to visit Brazil once and the first thing that was said to them was "fica a vontade" (literally "stay as you wish", but it actually means "make yourself home"). I can imagine they have a bad opinion about us and our fascination about "fica". :lol:

Also, we use the word "figa" in Brazil to refer to the gesture of putting your thumb between your index and middle finger. I was told this gesture is quite obscene in Italy, but in Brazil it means a way to superstitiously protect yourself against curses and bad luck (and it was appropriated by African-Brazilian religions as a way for one to protect oneself from bad things). 

 

I remember singer Laura Pausini also once taked about that in a radio interview, when she was asked how her first experience in Brazil (where she should be quite famous) was...:lol:

 

and yes, the gesture of putting the thumb between index and middle finger here means the act of fuc*ing...:yikes:

the supertitious gesture is just crossing index and middle finger (with the thumb just aside of those 2 fingers...like the emoticon -smiley, section 2- in this forum, by the way)...

Edited by phelps
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Werloc    846

In tennis they tend to say "Įteikė riestainį" when someone scores a 0 during a set. It would roughly translate into "Gave a doughnut" :d

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heywoodu    3,204
34 minutes ago, Werloc said:

In tennis they tend to say "Įteikė riestainį" when someone scores a 0 during a set. It would roughly translate into "Gave a doughnut" :d

Not much different than the English bagel for a 6-0 set (or of course the double bagel for two of those) :p

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heywoodu    3,204

A cyclist who is giving everything, mostly when riding on the flat and chasing down someone: "He's riding with his ass(hole) open" -- ("Met het hol open rijden")

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Werloc    846
4 minutes ago, heywoodu said:

Not much different than the English bagel for a 6-0 set (or of course the double bagel for two of those) :p

I'm not much familiar with tennis terms, I thought it was just our crazy media thing :d

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Vojthas    58

6:0 6:0 in tennis is "rowerek" in Polish, which is a diminutive for a "bicycle".

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